Oral History

 

Connecting Ohioans, One Story at a Time

 

Oral history is unparalleled in its ability to connect. An individual describing his or her own experiences is a primary source in its purest form, and using digital technology we can share those stories for generations to come. Oral history allows us to preserve the past in the words and voice of those that lived through it, but it also helps us connect with history that’s happening now by working with communities to document their lives as they unfold around us.

The Ohio History Connection is dedicated to preserving the memories of Ohioans from all walks of life. Oral histories are a key part of the Ohio History Connection’s mission to preserve and present the history of Ohio and Ohioans. This repository provides access to our collections of video, audio and interactive oral histories and will continue to grow as we continue collecting interviews across the state. Whether you are an academic historian, family history researcher or military buff, this repository will help you learn more about the individuals that make up the Ohio experience.

 


Oral History Collection

Below is a searchable table with links to all of our currently available oral histories, if you’d prefer you can also browse the entire collection on Ohio Memory.

TitleDescriptionLink
Mari Sunami oral historyMari Sunami is the daughter of Major Henry A. Norman, who served in the United States Air Corps from 1940-1965. Major Norman (born 11/10/1916, died 2002) entered the service in the Army Artillery in 1939, trained as a pilot at the Tuskegee Institute and was one of the first African American pilots in the US Armed Forces. He was deployed to the Italian Front, served as an artillery spotter until the end of World War II. He served as part of the Army of Occupation as a pilot in Germany until 1953 as well as during the Korean Conflict. His final military duty was Commanding Officer of Fort Hayes in Columbus, Ohio. Major Norman was award a number of service medals, including a medal and letter of commendation from the Queen of the Netherlands for his service in evacuating civilians during a flood in Holland in 1950. Major Norman graduated from Wilberforce College with a Bachelor's degree in History and received a Master's degree and Doctorate from the Ohio State University. Major Norman taught Science in the R.O.T.C. program at Morgan State College in Maryland from 1957-1959 and was Director of Education for the Department of Mental Health and Hygiene for the State of Ohio until his retirement in 1981.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Rhonda Watt oral historyRhonda Watt has been married to MSG Kevin Runyon since April 1995. In her interview she talks about the difficulties of being a wife of a citizen soldier. She also reveals how she met her husband while he was training to become a medic, and she was training to become a nurse.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Richard Garcia oral historyRichard Garcia is a retired Sergeant of the United States Army who served in the Vietnam War. He was an 11B40 Infantry Squad Leader. He earned two bronze stars, two air medals, and a South Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with Palm Leaf among other awards and medals. His duties included being the Squad Leader of the A company 2-2 First Infantry Division and the Squad Leader of the 11th Air Calvary, Aero Rifle Platoon during the Cambodian Invasion of 1970.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Megan Gupko oral historyMegan Gupko is the wife of First Lieutenant Andrew Gupko of the Ohio National Guard. She is a fourth generation military spouse. Andy joined the Army October 18, 2001. The couple met in 2003 and were married March 13, 2006 and are expecting their first child October 2010. First Lieutenant Gupko is a Blackhawk helicopter pilot with the B Company 1-137 Aviation Regiment based out of Rickenbacker Army Enclave in Columbus, Ohio and has been deployed to Balad, Iraq, as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2009? Megan was a public school teacher for several years. She became the 73rd Troop Commands' Brigade Family Readiness Assistant, after having been a volunteer Assistant Leader for her husband's Family Readiness Group. Disclaimer for Historical Materials: This item may contain offensive language, ideas or negative stereotypes reflecting the culture or language of a person, period or place. The Ohio Historical Society is presenting these items as part of the historical record.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Mike Harsh oral historyMichael Harsh is a veteran of the United States Army who served during the Vietnam War. Mike talks about his experiences in Vietnam while working as a communications engineer. Mr. Harsh reveals personal details regarding the Tet Offensive and the use of Agent Orange in Vietnam. Mike also talks about working at the Ohio Historical Society and what his tasks were while working there.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Tracy Williams oral historyLieutenant Colonel Tracy Williams joined the United States Army Reserve in June 1989, and as of this interview was still active. In 1991 she began serving as an Active Duty soldier. From August 1996 to April 1997 she was Officer in Charge of Assistant Chief of Staff for Personnel Logistics Operation Cell for the 21st Theater Army Area Command stationed in Kaiserslautern, Germany (Operation Joint Endeavor). From December 2002 to October 2003 she was the Communications Systems Support Officer for the 21st Training Support Center stationed in Heidleberg, Germany (Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom).Oral History at Ohio Memory
Kevin Runyon oral historyKevin Runyon is a Master Sergeant in the Ohio Army National Guard serving in the medical detachment at the Defense Supply Center of Columbus. Kevin enlisted in 1991 and completed basic training during the first Gulf War. In March of 1993 he evacuated civilians and provided EMS response in Southeast Ohio during the blizzard and served as a medic during the Lucasville Prison riot, after which he was awarded the expert field medical badge. In October of 1995 he transferred to Ft. Stewart Germany to the 24th Infantry Division (3rd Infantry Division). In 1996 he deployed to Kuwait to provide medical support for operation Intrinsic Action after which he was discharged from active duty and joined the Ohio Army National Guard. In 1997 he served in Manchester, Ohio providing medical care to the civilian population during the Ohio River Flood. In April of 1999 he provided support for the Cincinnati Tornado. In December of 2004 he provided support for the Dayton Snow Storm. In September of 2005 he served as Medical NCO overseeing four medical treatment facilities in Southwest Mississippi and New Orleans. In July 2006 through September of 2007 he served with the 285th American Society of Military Comptrollers in Operation Iraqi Freedom at Camp liberty Iraq. He was awarded the bronze star there. In February of 2010 he was promoted to Master Sergeant and assigned as the Senior Medic of the State Medical Detachment. His current civilian occupation is the Infection Control Manager for the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Frank Faletic oral historyFrank Faletic is a retired Sergeant First Class from the United States Army. He enlisted in 1962 and served as an MP at Ft. Hood Texas until 1963 with the 720 MP Battalion. From 1963-1965 He served as an MP in Braconne, France with the 552 MP Company. From 1977-83 he served with Company C of the 612th Engineer Battalion in Norwalk, Ohio with the Ohio National Guard. From 1983-1986 he served as NCO of the Combat Engineer Operations team with Company C, 612th Engineer Battalion. From 1986-1989 he served as Senior Personnel Administrative NCO with the Adjunct General Troop, Regimental Support Squadron, 107th Armored Calvary Regiment. From 1989-92 served as Chemical Operations NCO, 107 Armored Calvary Regiment. From 1992-2000 served as Training Sergeant with the Ohio Regional Training Institute.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Steven King oral historySteven King is a veteran of the United states Navy who served during the Vietnam War. He enlisted in August of 1965 and served until September of 1968. Steven served as an E-3 machinist mate in the engine room of the USS Reeves. He was also stationed in his first year in Midway Island as part of a crash crew. Steven earned the Vietnam service national defense medal as well as the Vietnam 3 star campaign medal. After serving in Vietnam Steven went on to working at Harvard University operating boiler systems at the university for over 30 years.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Dave Carroll oral historyDave Carroll is a veteran of the United States Army who served in the Vietnam War as a package deliverer on a helicopter. He spent a portion of his time in Vietnam in the Makong Delta region. He also spent time on various bases around the United States including Fort Hayes in Columbus, Ohio and Fort Benjamin Harrison in Lawrence, Indiana. Mr. Carroll talks about the dangers of flying in a helicopter during war time and offers insight into how Vietnam veterans were treated once they arrived home from serving overseas.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Joshua Mann oral historySergeant First Class Joshua Mann is the current historian for the Ohio Army National Guard serving at the Beightler Armory in Columbus, Ohio. He joined the ONG in March of 1995 where he served with the 148th infantry from 1995-2004. Since 2004 he has served as a 19D Calvary Scout. Shortly after September 11th, 2001 his unit provided security for a chemical depot in Newport, Indiana that housed a Cold War stock pile of VX nerve agent.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Glenn Harper oral historyGlenn Harper is a retired medic from the Ohio National Guard who served from 1965 until 1971. He served during a time when the guard was used for domestic disputes in Ohio, including racial disturbances in Akron, Truckers strikes, and the shootings at Kent State University in 1970. After serving in the National Guard Mr. Harper went on to pursue a college degree where he eventually earned a career at the Ohio Historical Society working in historic preservation. Currently he is an Adjunct Instructor at Wright State University.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Dan Snyder oral historyDaniel Snyder was born and raised in Ada, Ohio. His father, Barton F. Snyder, was editor and publisher of the Ada Herald for over 50 years. He graduated from Ohio State in 1956 with a degree in Political Science. In 1958 he earned his Juris Doctorate degree from the College of Law. Mr. Snyder enlisted in the Ohio Army National Guard in 1959. He rose to the rank of Sergeant E-5 before attending officer candidate school. He graduated from the Ohio Military Academy in 1963 and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant. He has served as a Rifle Platoon Leader, Company Commander ; S-3, 1-148th Infantry Battalion; Civil Affairs Officer, 73d Infantry Brigade; S-2, 73d Infantry Brigade; Battalion Commander, 1-166th Infantry Battalion; Battalion Commander 1-148 Infantry Battalion; J3, Operations Officer of Joint Task Force Aleutians; and G-3, Operations Officer for Detachment 4 Ohio State Area Command. Mr. Snyder was promoted to full Colonel in 1988. Colonel Snyder retired in 1993 as Special Affairs Officer for the Adjutant General of the State of Ohio. He was honorably discharged on August 25, 1995. In 1999 Colonel Snyder received the Distinguished Service Award from the Ohio National Guard Association. Dan has served as the President of the Ohio National Guard Officers association, President of the Findlay/Hancock County Bar Association; President of the Hancock County Ohio State Alumni Association, among serving with other organizations that help the community, including the Eagle Scouts and AMVETS. Daniel Snyder is also the senior partner in the law firm Snyder, Alge & Welch, having practiced law for 50 years in Findlay, Ohio since 1959. While with the Ohio National Guard he served in Ohio during tornadoes, truckers trike, snow storms, and during the Vietnam War protests of Ohio State University in May of 1970. He also served at Ft. Campbell, Ft. Ripley, Wales, and the Aleutian Islands. His highest medal is the Legion of Merit.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Andy Gupko oral historyFirst Lieutenant Andy Gupko is a 15A Uh-60 Aviator in Company B 1-137th Aviation Regiment. His civilian occupation is as an Air Traffic Control Specialist. He completed basic training at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in 2002 after he enlisted in October of 2001. He was made a commissioned officer in March of 2006. He received his B.S. in Aviation from Ohio University in 2006. He began his tenure in the military as a Avionics Mechanic in company D of the 1-137th AV BN from 2003-2006. Later he was a Platoon Leader of Company B and Company D of the 1-137th AV BN from 2007-2009. Presently he is the Commander of company B 1-137th AV BN. He has earned several medals and awards, including awards earned while in theater; including: Iraq Campaign Ribbon, Army Service Ribbon, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terror Service Medal Air Medal, etc...Oral History at Ohio Memory
David McDaniel oral historyRetired Sergeant Major David McDaniel served with the active army from 1973-1975 with Company C. 1st Engineer Battalion, 1st Infantry Division in Ft. Riley Kansas. He also served with the 518th Engineer Company, 193rd Infantry Brigade in Ft Kobbe, Panama Canal Zone. He served in the US Army Reserves from 1977-1978 with the 324th Engineer Detachment in Kings Mill, Ohio. He served with the Ohio Army National Guard from 1981-1985 with Company D 372nd Engineer Battalion. From 1985-1993 he served with the 112th Transportation Battalion. January 1993- October 1999 he served with the 73rd Troop command in Columbus, Ohio. October 1999- December 2004 he served with the 371st Corps Support Group. McDaniel served in operation Iraqi Freedom stationed at Camp Virginia, Kuwait working within a logistics unit routing convoys in theater.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Damon Stinger oral historySergeant First Class Damon A. Stinger Sr. enlisted into the Army in July 1987 from Columbus, Ohio. He served as a cannon crewmember in Bravo Battery 2nd Battalion 20th Field Artillery in Hanau, Germany from 1987 to 1989. In October 1989 he was reassigned to Charlie Battery 5th Battalion, 18th Field Artillery where he deployed to serve a combat tour in support of Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm. From 1997 to 2004 SFC Stinger served as the Platoon Sergeant and Operations Sergeant after joining the Army Reserves.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Greg Rogers oral historyLieutenant Colonel Greg Rogers joined the active duty Army in 1983 before joining the National Guard in 1986. Among his positions and accomplishments as a soldier LTC Greg Rogers has served as a Company Commander for the 11A00, CO E 1/148th Infantry Battalion in Urbana, Ohio. He also served as Commander of 01A00, HQ STARC Ohio in Columbus, Ohio. From September 2005-November 2009 with the 16th Engineer Brigade he served as a Civil Engineer designing and performing Quality Assurance of all vertical construction projects in and around Baghdad during Operation Iraqi Freedom. He also served as the State Historian at the Joint force Headquarters from 2007-2008. Presently he serves as the Design and Project Management Branch Chief for the Ohio National Guard.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Nicole Gabriel oral historyMajor Nicole M. Gabriel is in the Air Defense Military of the United States Army. She has served 17 years in the United States Army and Ohio National Guard. She was commissioned in June 1992 and went through ROTC at the Ohio State University were she completed her bachelor's degree in Journalism. She spent 4 years on Active Duty serving in a PATRIOT missile battalion at Fort Polk, Louisiana. During that time, she was deployed to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia twice (1993 and 1994). She left active duty in 1996 and had a 6-month break in the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) when she was assigned to the 449th Aviation Group of the North Carolina Army National Guard. In 1999, she returned to Ohio where she joined the Ohio National Guard. In 2004, she returned to active duty initially for Active Duty for Operational Support, and then in 2005 as Active Guard Reserve. In 2006-2007, she was deployed Kuwait in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom where her unit ran the largest reception camp in the 3d Army.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Jeremy Banta oral historyMajor Jeremy Banta entered the Reserve Officer Training Corps at the Ohio State University in 1988 and received Reserve Duty Commission in the Transportation Corps in 1993. His civilian career has spanned over 14 years in the logistics community. In March of 2002 Major Banta joined the ONG as a full time technician. He currently is a Supply Systems Analyst for the United States Property and Fiscal Office, Supply and Services Division, Ohio National Guard. He has served as a platoon leader for the Army Reserve 464th Transportation Company and the ONG 1485th Transportation Company. In 2001 he was assigned to the 371st Corps support group in Kettering, Ohio as the transportation officer in support operations. In 2002 the 1485th was mobilized in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and returned after a successful tour in 2004. His unit was awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its actions while deployed.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Betty Tibbs oral historyBetty Tibbs is the widow of Howard A. Tibbs a USA Air Force veteran during World War II. His grandfather Charles Howard was a soldier in the Civil War with the Ohio Colored troops. Her brother Paul Clark served with the US Army 10th Calvary in AZ from 1938-1945. She also had two brother in laws (Harold Dykes and Albert Bradley) serve in WW II. Her husband Howard A. Tibbs was a part of the group that would later been known as the "Tuskegee Airmen" which was composed of African American Air Force members from 1941-1948.Oral History at Ohio Memory
James Abraham oral historyBrigadier General James Abraham was born in Athens, Ohio on November 21, 1922. He enlisted in the Army after the bombing of Pearl Harbor at Fort Hayes in Columbus, Ohio. He completed basic and advanced training at Camp Crowder, Missouri. After that, he was sent to Camp Shenango in Youngstown, Ohio where he would wait until being shipped to Liverpool, England where he served in the 32-55th Joint Assault Company which was an Intelligence Unit. He would later arrive on Omaha Beach in Normandy, France soon after D-Day. James Abraham served time in Normandy, France, Nancy, France, the Ardennes Mountains, Frankfort, Germany, Austria, Belgium, and Czechoslovakia. After he came home, James Abraham served in the Ohio National Guard and was a part of the "Riot Battalion" for a number of years. He would leave the Ohio National Guard for a time to become an ROTC instructor for a bit, before returning again to the Ohio National Guard. In this video, James Abraham discusses what it was like for him growing up, basic training, combat in Europe, his time in the Ohio National Guard, the Riot Battalion, and life after the military.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Craig Huffman oral historyCraig Huffman was born on September 21, 1947 in Columbus, Ohio. He graduated from Bishop Ready High School in 1965 and enlisted soon after becoming apart of the 37th Infantry. He completed his basic training at Fort Knox and became a radio operator. In 1968 he joined the police academy and spent 33 years as a police officer. During this interview, Craig Huffman spends the majority of his time talking about his experiences in the Ohio National Guard, and his progression up the chain of command.Oral History at Ohio Memory
John S. Martin oral historyBrigadier General John S. Martin was born in Wellston, Ohio in Jackson County on February 16, 1942 but grew up in Lima, Ohio. He graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in Business Administration and was working on his Master's degree when his number was pulled during the draft. Mr. Martin then joined the Army and went into flight school. Mr. Martin completed basic training at Fort Knox, Kentucky and completed flight school in Fort Wolters, Texas. Mr. Martin flew helicopter gunships in Vietnam in 1968 and participated in many offensive battles, including the Tet Offensive. He earned the Distinguished Flying Cross for his duty. After Vietnam, Mr. Martin joined the Ohio National Guard and at one point became the Assistant Ohio Adjunct General. During this interview, Mr. Martin discusses his childhood, time in college, time in Vietnam, and his experience in the Ohio National Guard.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Robert L. Dilts oral historyRetired Colonel Robert L. Dilts was born in Ada, Ohio on December 27, 1929. He would sign up for the Ohio National Guard in 1947 and become apart of the 148th Infantry Regiment. During his time in the Ohio National Guard, Mr. Dilts was stationed mostly at Camp Perry, and Camp Polk until he was sent to Korea for active duty in July of 1952. During his time in Korea, Mr. Dilts served as an Intelligence Officer in the 180th Infantry Regiment. In July of 1953, Mr. Dilts returned home and was released from service next month in August. He would remain away from the Ohio National Guard until a few months later in October when he rejoined the Ohio National Guard and became a training officer in 1960. During this interview, Mr. Dilts discusses his childhood, activities that took place at Camp Polk, his time in Korea, and much about his time in the Ohio National Guard.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Keven Clouse oral historyMajor Keven Clouse began his career in the military in September of 1986 when he joined the Alabama Army National Guard as a Cavalry Scout with the 31st Cavalry. Later he served as an infantry platoon leader in the Florida Army National Guard. Starting in 1989 he served with the Ohio Army National Guard serving in various capacities including an Armor Company Commander with the 147th and serving as a Battle Staff Training team officer and an OPS officer for the Joint Forces Headquarters for the Ohio National Guard.Oral History at Ohio Memory
George Brubaker oral historyGeorge W. Brubaker was a private first class during World War II between 1944 and 1945. He entered the military in March 1944 at age 26. He was a member of the 70th Infantry Division B-Company 275th Regiment. He was trained at several different camps including Camp Adair, Oregon, Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri, and Camp Miles Standish, Massachusetts. His first overseas mission sent him to Marseilles, France, then by train to Alsace in the Lorraine area. In the Falkenberg Mountain area the Germans captured him at the Battle of the Bulge where he was taken prisoner January 6th. He was a POW in Bad Orb, Germany at Stalag IX-B. While there his barracks were strafed. On February 22, 1945 he left Bad Orb for a camp 4-F Trebnitz. 4-F was a work camp coal factory where prisoners worked 12 hours a day. On April 13, 1945 he was liberated and taken to the Red Cross. He was later medically discharged.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Ronyelle Stallworth oral historyRonyelle Stallworth was a 92-A Automated Logistic Specialist for a maintenance unit in the Army. He was a database administrator and a unit level logistics system. He served on a unit in the Army Reserves, as well with the Army National Guard.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Robin Timmons oral historyRetired Brigadier General Robin Timmons assumed the duties of Commander, 16th Engineer Brigade, Ohio Army National Guard, Columbus, Ohio on September 30, 2002. He commanded all assigned engineer units in Ohio, and as a Task Force Commander, controlled all units for state active duty assignments. General Timmons' military career began in the United States Army Reserve in 1972. General Timmons was appointed 2LT in the Ohio Army National Guard in 1974. His assignments in the Ohio Army National Guard include Deputy STARC Commander, HQ STARC, Deputy Brigade Commander, 16th Engineer Brigade, Commander, 416th Engineer Group, Commander, 2d Battalion 174th Air Defense Artillery (HAWK), Commander, 372d Engineer Battalion. He served in Operation Iraqi Freedom as Commander of Headquarters, 16th Engineer Brigade, OIF, 05-07, 4th Infantry Division, Multi-National Division-Baghdad, Iraq.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Curtis Wilson oral historyCurtis Wilson is a CW3 (Chief Warrant Officer with the Army National Guard). He enlisted in 1993 as a Technical Inspector for the 372nd Maintenance Company. Later he served as a Motor Sergeant and a Unit First Sergeant for the same company. He was mobilized between August 2004 and March 2005 as a G-4 Material Readiness Officer at Camp Bondsteel, Kosovo. His second deployment was from January 2008-January 2009 as an Executive Officer for Company B, 237th BSB in Camp Virginia, Kuwait during Operation Iraqi Freedom.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Scott White oral historyColonel Scott A. White of Columbus, Ohio enlisted in the Army National Guard November 1980 and is currently the Deputy Brigade Commander (Acting Commander) of the 16th Engineer Brigade (Active Guard Reserve). From September 2005 to November 2006, he was deployed to Camp Liberty, Baghdad Iraq, serving as the Brigade Operations and Plans Officer (G3) during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Colonel White has been award the Bronze Star, Combat Action Badge, Iraq Campaign Medal, the Bronze Order of the De Fleury Medal and many others.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Todd Kleismit oral historyTodd Kleismit is a retired veteran of the U.S. Army who served as a Photojournalist during the first Gulf War. He was deployed to Saudi Arabia with the 1st Medical Group, 13th Corps Support Command (Fort Hood, TX). He began basic training in November of 1988 in Fort Know, Kentucky and attended Basic Military Journalism course at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana. His last nine months of service we spent at Fort Lewis, Washington where he left in June of 1992. Todd also talks about his college experiences and working for the Ohio Historical Society.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Herb Eagon oral historyBrigadier General Herbert Eagon was born in Akron, OH, just before the outbreak of World War II. His father served in the South Pacific in the 37th division during that conflict. He joined the national guard his senior year of high school, in 1956, in Delaware County. Upon graduating from high school, he attended Officer Candidate School and Ranger School. Upon completion, he transferred back to the company he originally joined in high school. His unit trained more actively during Vietnam, but like most reserves was not mobilized. When he was with the 37th Brigade, he was deployed to protect military installations in the Aleutian Islands in the 1980s. When the 166th Infantry Regiment was decommissioned in 1993, Eagon retired from the National Guard.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Robert L. Lawson oral historyRobert Lawson is a retired Brigadier General. He was born February 6, 1932 in Columbus, Ohio. He joined The Ohio National Guard in 1951. He served first in the 73rd Brigade and then moved to the State Headquarters as an Assistant G1. Lawson talks about his move from Technician Personnel Officer to the Chief of Staff and his experiences as Chief of Staff, including the blizzard in 1978. He also explains some of the changes The Ohio National Guard underwent during his service and the differences between the Guard today and during his service. He describes his time as Brigadier General of the 16th Engineer Brigade and some of the officers he knew during his service. After he retired in 1991, Lawson worked with The Ohio National Guard Association as the Executive Director.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Chris Ballard oral historyAndre C. Ballard (Chris) was born in 1983 in Hampton, VA. His parents relocated to Columbus when he was young and he grew up in Marion, OH. He joined the National Guard in high school and spent two years studying construction management at The Ohio State University. Ballard spoke of his first deployment to Wright-Patterson Air Fore Base and balancing his duties with the demands of college. He discussed his adjustment to being married, achieving the rank of Sergeant, college at Mt. Vernon Nazarene, and his decision to become an officer. Ballard detailed his experience in Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina where he was part of a relief effort from the Ohio National Guard. He also explained his desire to deploy overseas, being stationed in Egypt in 2008-2009, working with soldiers from different countries, and his duties while there. He continues to detail his return home, his movements at this time, serving with the 37th infantry, and a job that lead to his decision to have a military career. Ballard speaks of acting as Rear Guard Commander for his unit that was going to Afghanistan in 2011, working with the wounded, training, and organizing projects stateside. He explains returning to the civilian workforce before becoming full-time National Guard and his roles there. In 2016 Ballard worked logistics with the 371st Sustainment Brigade and is expected to deploy to Kuwait in the near future. He reflects on some difficult times when he has lost soldiers and friends, his family's adaptations to his career, and how he feels about his service.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Andrew Aquino oral historyChaplain Andrew Aquino was born in Chillicothe, Ohio in 1958. He joined the National Guard as a chaplain in 1987 as a component of his ministry as Baptist pastor. He speaks of his early life growing up in Ohio and how he decided to go to school to become a Baptist minister. Chaplain Aquino describes his transition from a civilian minister to chaplain in the National Guard, and what boot camp was like for a non-combatant chaplain. He details his first deployment to Camp Bondsteel in Kosovo in 2004, how his family reacted to his deployment and how he kept in touch with them, his management of other chaplains, daily life on base, and his duties. Chaplain Aquino explains his return from Kosovo in 2005 and getting readjusted to civilian life before his return active duty later that year in the Iraq-Kuwait Theater. He continues to detail his experiences at Camp Navistar in Kuwait including his ride-along in convoys, his relationship with his men, life on the base, and his interactions with local culture. Chaplain Aquino returns home in 2006 where he is placed in a full-time position as the State Chaplain for Ohio. He speaks of his duties helping returning soldiers adjust to civilian life and dealing with traumatic memories. He also discusses how his faith is reflected by his service and how his service has influenced his beliefs.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Leonard Burke oral historyLeonard P. Burke III was born in 1980 in Youngstown, Ohio. He joined the Ohio National Guard in 2006 specializing in avionics working on Chinook, Blackhawk, Apache, Lakota, and Kiowa helicopters. He also trained to become a 15T, or Blackhawk Helicopter Repairer. In his interview Burke described what growing up in Youngstown in the 1980s was like, going to college at Youngstown State University, and the variety of jobs he held before entering the Ohio National Guard. He discusses his feeling about joining the National Guard, boot camp, learning to work as a team in the Guard, his Military Occupational Specialty in avionics, and his Advanced Individual Training at Fort Eustis. He explained his decision to volunteer to go to Iraq in 2009, how he became a 15T Blackhawk repairer, and the job of a crew chief on a Blackhawk. He also gives an overview of the steps of his pre-deployment and deployment to Balad Air Base in Iraq. Burke reviews the types of missions he flew on Blackhawks, which include ring routes, detainee ops, state ops, and time sensitive target missions. He details his interest in Iraq history, dealing with the stresses of being in a combat zone, the positive aspects of belonging to the military community, and his humanitarian missions transporting high-profile guests. Burke talks about how he and others on the base stayed in touch with their families and how being on a military base could insulate you from things going on back home. He closes with his return home from deployment, finding a new career, coming to Columbus, Ohio and how the National Guard can have a positive influence on a person's life.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Kristin Cruikshank oral historyKristin Cruikshank was born in 1981 in Newark, Ohio. Cruikshank enlisted in the United States Army in high school because it offered opportunities to do and see new things. She talks about growing up in Columbus and Portsmouth, OH, her life working and going to school at Fort Irwin, and what it is like being a garrison and field cook. Cruikshank details her memories of 9/11, her time at Giessen Depot in Germany, and her younger brother's enlistment in the Army. She goes on to describe her deployment to Iraq via Kuwait in 2003, being stationed at Baghdad Island, and what it is like to be in a mortar attack. She explains how she had family ties to Iraqis living in Baghdad, how they became part of her life while stationed there, and her perception of how the Iraqis felt about the Army's deployment. Cruikshank tells of participating in raids, being a part of convoys, and being a logistics coordinator. She reviews her travels during her time in Germany and the trips around the world she took after she left the Army. She also speaks of her civilian after the Army and why she decided to join the Ohio National Guard. Cruikshank explains the various jobs she has held, what it has been like to be a woman in the Army, questions she has had about 9/11 and her service, and how she feels about her service in the Armed Forces.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Nicholas Chou oral historyNicholas A. Chou was born in 1974 in Lowell, Massachusetts. His family moved to Miamisburg, Ohio when he was very young and he grew up there. From 1994 Chou served in the Ohio National Guard and the United States Armed Forces. In 2004 he was a part of post-Katrina support in Louisiana and deployed to Kuwait in 2006. He enlisted straight out of high school to qualify for financial support to go to college. In his interview Chou talks about his reasons for joining the National Guard, what he learned during basic training, his time studying engineering at The Ohio State University, and why he transferred to Cedarville College. He explains his personal struggle to find himself and his faith, enrolling in Grand Rapids Theological Seminary, his time in Michigan, and why he decided to reenlist as a candidate for chaplaincy. Chou describes meeting his wife, his desire to work with families, and his work with the National Guard doing post-Katrina support. He details his deployment to Camp Navistar in Kuwait, his work there preparing soldiers for the reality of a combat zone, and helping those who are dealing with loss. He discusses his choice to move from Michigan to Columbus, Ohio for a 1-year chaplaincy, how he worked to support families during the deployment of the 37th Infantry Division in 2007-2008, and the various support initiatives he has worked on since. Chou also speaks of his current work reaching out to soldiers during training, the importance of suicide prevention, and how he sees his faith tied to his military career.Oral History at Ohio Memory
James Field oral historyJames G. Field was born in Newark, Ohio in 1984. He joined the Ohio National Guard in 2007 after finishing college at The Ohio State University. In his interview Field discusses growing up in Newark, his family's military history, and how 9/11 affected his outlook on military service. He talks about his time in college, why he joined the National Guard, his time on Rear Guard Detachment, and serving with his brother. Field recounts attending Officer Candidacy School and training to be a Ranger, both at Fort Benning in Georgia while his wife planned their wedding. He explains the training he went through prior to mobilization, the organization of the units being deployed, life at Mazar-e-Sharif Airfield, his unit's role, and working with the Afghan National Army. Field details the day-to-day operations of his unit and many examples of the combat situations they faced. He also describes the relationships he has built in the National Guard, how to be a leader to the men he commands, and the difficulties transitioning from a combat environment to the homefront. He concludes telling what knowledge he might pass on to his younger self and how he feels veterans want to be viewed after they return to their civilian lives.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Russell Galeti oral historyRussell P. Galeti Jr. was born in Garfield Heights, Ohio in 1980. He was drawn to the armed forces when he became interested in his family's military history. He enlisted in the Ohio National Guard in 1998 as an M1 Abrams armor crewman. In his interview Galeti talks about growing up in a big family, his interest in his family's military service, joining the National Guard, going to The Ohio State University, and his experiences in basic training. He explains his choice to transfer to Kent State, his memories of 9/11, the pull between the Navy and National Guard, and his deployment to Iraq. He discusses the difficulties of war, preparing Humvees for duty, his interactions with Iraqis, and his day-to-day activities. Galeti reflects on his experiences at Forward Operating Base Caldwell, his return home, dealing with the difficulties of coming back to civilian life, and his homecoming at Fort Bragg. He speaks of his attempt to join the Navy, his Army aviation training and Officer Candidate School, working for Ted Strickland's campaign, and working a civilian job. Galeti recounts learning that he was assigned to an Operational Mentoring and Liaison Team in Afghanistan, training at Fort Riley, and working with the Hungarian Army. He speaks about his time with the Afghan National Army, the combat operations they undertook, moving from Bagram Airfield to Joint Combat Post Khilagay, and his decision to go to graduate school. He concludes with his reflections on his service, how it influenced his view on the United States' involvement abroad, and how he feels the National Guard fits into the modern military.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Claudio Garcia-Castro oral historyClaudio Garcia-Castro was born in Matamoros, Mexico in 1970. Garcia-Castro moved to South Vienna, Ohio in 1981 with his parents who relocated for a new job. He enlisted in the United States Army in 1998 specializing as a mechanic. In his interview Garcia-Castro speaks of how his family came to Ohio, going to The Ohio State University, his reasons for joining the Army, and his basic training at Fort Hood in Texas. He discusses how he kept in contact with his wife, going to Bosnia on a peacekeeping mission, working as a mechanic, and learning about the Ohio National Guard. Garcia-Castro talks about his decision to join the Ohio National Guard and attend Officer Candidate School, his memories of 9/11, how he felt about the possibility of being deployed again, how his family felt, and his pre-deployment training. He explains how the different branches of the Armed Forces come together in the field, what his mission was in Iraq, the differences between Iraq and Bosnia, and what it was like during a mortar attack on Balad Air Base. Garcia-Castro discusses what it was like to manage a maintenance operation, how they reinforced unarmored vehicles, how the National Guard has changed, and what it was like coming back to civilian life. He concludes by recounting the decision to work with the National Guard full-time, what it was like being deployed to Al Assad Air Base, working with contractors, and how he feels about his service.Oral History at Ohio Memory
David Kitchen oral historyDavid Kitchen was born in London, Ohio in 1988. He wanted to do something new so he enlisted in the Ohio Air National Guard in 2009. In his interview Kitchen talks about his family's history of military service, his decision to enlist, his time during basic training, and an experience with an attempted suicide. He explains his original Military Occupational Specialty, how he transferred to the Air Transportation specialty, and preparing to deploy to Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan. Kitchen describes the deployment process, his mission in Afghanistan, what Bagram Airfield was like, and the details of his job. He discusses being on Alpha shift, volunteerism in the Armed Forces, what being in a combat zone was like, and being on the base as opposed to the frontline. He recounts some accidents around the base, a major incident involving a 747, working with contractors of different nationalities, some examples of Medevac flights to Ramstein Air Base, and transporting caskets. He tells of the secrecy around prisons and prisoners, the kind of contraband he would find on flights, what it was like getting ready to come home, his homecoming experience, how being at war changed him, and his Air Transportation work stateside. He concludes by speaking about leaving his friends, how he feels about his military service, what he brought back from Afghanistan, tattoos, and what he'll tell people about his service.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Matt Molinski oral historyMatt Molinski, born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1978, discusses his military service career, which began with his enlistment in the Army under a ""2x4"" plan with the Ohio Army National Guard during his senior year of high school, in June of 1996. Molinski details his military experiences in the Army -- including basic training, MOS assignment and advanced trainings, and his station at Ft. Drumm in 1997. Molinski goes on to describe his transition to the Ohio Army National Guard; his college education at Bowling Green State University, and decision to commission as an officer. He also details on-the-ground experiences, camaraderie, communications with family and home and mission duties during two overseas deployments: to Baghdad in 2004-2005; and to Southern Iraq/Kuwait in 2008, during which deployments Molinski served as company commander and company executive officer, respectively. Molinski's interview also sheds light on his initial difficulty adjusting to civilian life after his first Iraq deployment, other training opportunities overseas, and overall reflections on the impact of his service career on his life and sense of vocation.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Tyler Ogden oral historyTyler Ogden was born in 1982 in Springfield, OH. He enlisted in the Ohio Air National Guard in 2003 specializing as a Security Forces Journeyman. In his interview he talks about his family, his reasons for joining the National Guard, his memories of 9/11, and his experiences at basic training. Ogden recounts what being in the National Guard Security Forces was like, working with other Guard members, and preparing for his first deployment. He explains what it was like arriving in Baghdad, what life was like on the base, what some of his duties were, and how he interacted with contractors and other military personnel. Ogden describes what people did to entertain themselves, seeing death up-close, and how he got injured during an attack. He continues to discuss how the medevacs extracted him, the support he received from other soldiers, and being awarded the Purple Heart. Ogden speaks about his recovery, his family's support, dealing with posttraumatic stress disorder, and his treatment with hypnotherapy. He concludes by discussing how he became a recruiter, his approach to his new job, what he feels civilians should know about those who serve in the military, and his advice for others who suffer PTSD.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Robert Paley oral historyRobert H. Paley was born in 1966 in Honolulu, Hawaii on Schofield Barracks. Paley enlisted in the United States Army in 1984 and the Ohio National Guard in 2001, deploying in 1989 to Germany and again in 2008 to Afghanistan. Unlike many of the other veteran interviews, Paley's touching story focuses on a quest to keep a promise to his father rather than on his military experiences. In his interview he talks about his father's military service and disability, the meaning of a silver dollar, and the importance of West Point. He describes his paternal grandmother, his father's early medical treatments, his promise to attend West Point, and becoming a Judo champ. Paley recalls his first rejection to West point, a letter and how it got him accepted, and his first day at school. He recalls what it was like attending West Point, seeking a second doctor's opinion for his father, and being given another chance at graduation. Paley discusses his graduation, fulfilling his promise to his father, and ultimately his father's death. He concludes by speaking of the difficulties in writing this story, his service after West Point, enlisting in the Ohio National Guard, and the importance of sharing his experiences.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Michelle Poole oral historyMichelle D. Poole was born in 1981 in Galion, Ohio. She enlisted in the Ohio National Guard in in 1999 and served in the United States Armed Forces deploying in 2003 to Afghanistan and in 2005 for post-Katrina support. In her interview Poole talks about the history of military service in her family, her decision to join the National Guard, basic training, and choosing her Military Occupational Specialty. She describes attending college, her wedding and marriage prior to deployment, and the deployment process at Camp Arifjan. She explains her mission in Iraq, what it was like living on a base, and the benefit of working with people from different places. She recalls her first combat experience, taking small arms fire, and working to protect third country nationals. Poole discusses the difficulties of leaving fellow soldiers behind, adjusting to civilian life, the emotional support she got from other Guard members, and her missed opportunity to receive counseling. She recounts her husband's deployment to Afghanistan, what it was like at home without him, her family readiness group, and her husband's experience with veteran's services. Poole speaks about working full-time with the National Guard, her state active duty, and how her military experience has changed how she interacts with her family. Poole concludes by discussing how anyone can serve their country in the military, her memories of 9/11, and how deployment affects the lives of so many.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Timothy Rickey oral historyTimothy A. Rickey was born in Columbus, Ohio in 1971. He enlisted in the United States Army in 2002, shortly after 9/11. In his interview Rickey talks about his family and their military history, his memories of 9/11, his choice to join the United States Army, and his family's reaction. He discusses his basic training, his instruction to be a combat medic, his deployment to Iraq in 2003, catching up with the front line, his daily duties, and seeing his first action at Balad Air Base. Rickey describes moving to Fallujah, his return to Fort Stewart, his perception of how the war was seen back in the United States, and the change in his training based on the introduction of Improvised explosive devices. He explains his second deployment in 2005 to Camp Rustamiyah, his first experience dealing with American fatalities, and the support the medical staff gave to each other. He recounts his trip home for the birth of his fifth child, the Medical Civilian Assistance Program, and his interactions with Iraqis. Rickey speaks of coming home and his choice to join the Ohio National Guard rather than reenlist in the Army. He concludes by recounting how his service has impacted his life, what people should know about those who serve, and a humorous story about a lieutenant's pants.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Alex Rozanski oral historyAlex J. Rozanski was born in Columbus, Ohio in 1980. He served in both the United States Marine Reserves and the Ohio National Guard. In his interview Rozanski talks about his initial interest and enlistment in the Marine Corp Reserves, his experience at basic training, and his advanced individual training to be an infantryman. He discusses his memories of 9/11, waiting to be deployed for four years, his 2003 deployment to South America, and his family's reaction to the news he was deploying to Iraq. Rozanski explains his pre-deployment training, the deployment process to Al Assad Air Base, his first months in Iraq, and his first firefight near Haditha Dam. He goes on to describe the camaraderie with in the unit, assimilating soldiers from other units, women's roles in the Armed Forces at the time, and clearing houses while looking for weapons caches. Rozanski speaks of the cultural differences in Iraq, the Iraqis attitude toward U.S. soldiers, and what contraband they found. He recounts the combat missions were they suffered casualties, his communications back home, his units continuing operations, and how he felt about the overall mission. He concludes by talking about his return home, honoring his brother with his service, Lima Company, and what people should know about those who serve.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Randall Schumacher oral historyRandall S. Schumacher was born in New Iberia, Louisiana in 1983. He moved with his family to Dresden, Ohio in the 1990s when his father relocated for work. In his interview he talks about his family and their military history, his memories of 9/11, going to college, and his choice to join the Ohio National Guard. Schumacher recounts his decision to join the 684th Area Support Medical Company, his basic training at Fort Jackson, training as a Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Specialist, and what it was like working with the 684th Medical Company. He discusses why he was chosen to go to Afghanistan during the troop surge in 2011, his pre-mobilization, and what Manas, Kyrgyzstan and western Afghanistan were like. Schumacher describes his mission at Shindand Air Base, a typical day on base, making friends in the military, and an average surgical team scenario. He explains how he dealt with the stresses of his job, the dark humor of medical staff, communicating with his family, and preparing to return home. He concludes by talking about his life now, his aspirations, how he feels the military affected him, and what people should know about those who serve.Oral History at Ohio Memory
David Thomas oral historyDavid R. Thomas was born in Ravenna, Ohio in 1957. He enlisted in the United States Marine Corp in 1976 and in the Ohio National Guard in 1981. In his interview he talks about his early life, joining the United States Marine Corp, his basic training, and his Military Occupational Specialty. Thomas discusses his choice to leave the Marine Corp in 1978, enlisting in the Ohio National Guard in 1981, and becoming full-time Active Guard Reserve in 1986. He explains the numerous positions and stations he served in while he was with the Active Guard Reserve until 1993 when he rejoined the traditional Guard and took a job as a police officer in Brimfield, Ohio. Thomas recounts his memories of 9/11, returning to the Guard full-time, his pre-mobilization at Fort Bragg, and reinforcing Humvees in Kuwait. He speaks about being sent as part of an advance party to Forward Operating Base Cobra in Iraq, rocket attacks on the base, protecting polling places, and the police in Iraq. He speaks Iraqi customs and culture, his feelings about his mission, what daily life was like on base, and some missions of which he was apart. Thomas describes Iraqi towns, several Iraqi acquaintances, and returning home. He concludes by talking about the people he has met in the military, how the Guard has changed over the years, and what people should know about those who serve in the military.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Ray McKinster oral historyRay McKinster was born in 1925 in Columbus, Ohio. In 1943 he was drafted into the Navy where he served as a Merchant Marine. He was stationed aboard the Charles A. Wickliffe a tanker built by Delta Shipbuilding of New Orleans in 1943. The Wickliffe's main role was to transport oil to locations too small for larger tankers. McKinster's job aboard ship was to provide security and to act as a signalman. He survived numerous enemy attacks and saved two sailors from being crushed by the ship, for which he earned the Life Saving Medal. He was honorably discharged in 1945 and returned home to start a family.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Paul Stephan oral historyPaul Stephan was born in Forest, Ohio in 1931. His father—Allen Stephan—was a farmer who was one of the first to adopt hybrid seed corn in Ohio in 1937 and later became a seed producer. Paul attended The Ohio State University and got a degree in Agronomy. At the time participation in the Reserve Officer Training Corp [ROTC] was required at OSU and Paul went on to Advanced Air Force ROTC to get the opportunity to fly. He trained in jet fighters like the F-86 Sabre and the Republic F-84 Thunderjet. From 1953 to 1956 he served in the United States Air Force and the Strategic Air Command. At the time jet technology was still relatively new and Stephan referred to himself and other jet pilots of the time as “guinea pigs” for jet designers and manufacturers. The high-rate of accidental deaths and his own close call convinced Stephan that the Air Force was no place for a family man. He left the service—choosing not to reenlist—ultimately returning home to farming and the seed business.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Barbara Kruse oral historyBarbara (Currier) Kruse was born in 1923 in Manchester, New Hampshire. The attack on Pearl Harbor inspired her to serve her country, what she really wanted to do was be a Marine. It wasn't until 1943 that the Marines allowed female recruits that Barbara was able to follow her dream. She worked in recruiting and enlistment out of New Orleans, and attained the rank of staff sergeant. She and her friend were used as models for the design of the Molly Marine statue. In this video she talks about her time in the Marines and how she served.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Ames W. Chapman oral historyDr. Ames Chapman is a retired professor from Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio. He was a quartermaster in the 3689th Truck Company. These trucking convoys were known as the Red Ball Express and were responsible for supplying the men on the frontlines. The 3689 Quartermaster Truck Company was based out of Weymouth, Dorset, England. Chapman describes the Red Ball as constantly on the move and never really in one place for very long. He went on to get his PhD in sociology and retired from teaching at Central State University in 1988.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Harold Warren oral historyHarold Warren spent WWII overseas in Italy, Algeria, North Africa. Warren was drafted in 1943 and assigned to the 370th Regimental Combat Team, 92nd Infantry Division, called the “Buffalo Soldiers.” Warren fought against Nazi forces in Italy, where he spent the majority of his time overseas. He was never shot or wounded by shrapnel in combat but poor eyesight took him off the front line. He was assigned to an Engineer Fire Fighting Platoon. He helped translate message from the Italian resistance. These message typically contained information about the locations of the German forces. After the war he went back to school eventually settling in Dayton, OH. Warren retired from a position at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base after 34 years of service.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Dorothy Harris oral historyHarris was born in Cincinnati, Oh in 1940. After high school she followed her brother's lead and joined the United States Navy. She worked in the Hospital Corps. at St. Albans Naval Hospital in New York for her three years in the Navy. She returned to Cincinnati and went to college for nursing and then joined the Army in 1966. She was sent to Fort Sam Houston for her officer training. Harris was assigned to the 12th Evac. Hospital near Cu Chi, Vietnam. They treated all type of injuries at their tent hospital including children and locals. From there she was transferred to Letterman Army Hospital in San Francisco, Harris was only there a short time before she was transferred again to the V.A. Hospital in Dayton where she worked for the next 24 years. She retired with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the Army Reserves.Oral History at Ohio Memory
John Kaufman oral historyJohn Kaufman was born in 1922 in Middletown, OH. He was drafted in 1942, while he was working for Bell Telephone as a line man. He enlisted in the Army and was sent to Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indiana. He went through Camp Shelby to Seattle before transferring to Pacific theater. He was a warrant officer with the Army Signal Corp Stationed at Schofield Barracks near Honolulu. Kaufman was moved to the Tenth Army under the command of Lieutenant General Simon Bolivar Buckner Jr. He boarded the S.S. Jacob A. Westervelt and was taken to the Island of Okinawa where he was part of the assault on the island.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Virginia (Morriss) Parrish oral historyVirginia (Morriss) Parrish was born in 1916 in Jeannette, Pennsylvania. After graduating high school she intended on going to college, but because of the Great Depression her father lost his job and they could afford to send her. Instead she trained in nursing and was able to work her way through school. She earned her post graduate in in OB-GYN, and work for a number of hospitals into the 1940s. She enlisted in the military and was sent to work for the Army Air Force at Fort George Wright Rehab Hospital in Spokane, Washington. There she met a pilot who had been shot down over France (Fred Parrish) who was there to recover and they were soon married. Fred stayed in the military so she has lived all over the world including: Montana, Okinawa, England, Scotland, San Antonio. In this video she talk about her time in the military and working as a nurse there after.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Jack Buel oral HistoryJack Orin Buel was born in 1922 in Columbus, Ohio. He was drafted and sent to train in Wisconsin in the artillery. He was sent to Wales where he worked in the armored artillery for General Paton. They were sent to Paris, then to Alsace-Loraine, fought on the frontlines, through Belgium to the Siegfried Line, and eventually ended up in Czechoslovakia. In this video Jack tells stories from his time with the tanks and what he did after.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Governor Richard Celeste oral history, part 1.In part 1 Governor Celeste covers his early life up to his time working in the Indian Embassy in 1963. Richard Celeste was born in 1937 in Cleveland, Ohio to Margaret and Frank Celeste. He graduated magna cum laude from Yale University and received the Rhodes Scholarship to Exeter College at Oxford before going to work for the Peace Corp. He served as special assistant to Chester Bowles while Bowles was the United States Ambassador to India. After his time in India he returned to the United States and worked for a short time as a teacher before running for the Ohio House of Representatives. He was elected to the Ohio House of Representatives from Cuyahoga County in 1970 and became the Lieutenant Governor under Jim Rhodes in 1974. He lost the Governor's race in 1978 and took the job as director of the Peace Corps from 1979 to 1981. He ran for and was elected as Governor in 1982, he won again in 1986 against Jim Rhodes who had defeated him previously. While governor, Celeste increased support for mental health & addiction services, funding for education, children services including providing onsite daycare for state employees, and human services as a whole. Before Celeste, Ohio was near the bottom among states in providing these programs. He opened government positions to African Americans and women. In fact, his administration posted more women to cabinet positions than all prior governors combined. Under his leadership state employee unions were allowed to negotiate wages and benefits in addition to working conditions. At the end of his second term he commuted several prisoners death sentences to life terms, including granting clemency to 25 female prisoners who had committed crimes because they were victims of domestic abuse. He went to work in consulting, but he big question of what do you do after being governor wasn't answered until 1997 when President Bill Clinton appointed him ambassador to India. His previous experience with Chester Bowles in India made him an excellent fit for the position. He returned home in 2001 looking for a new challenge, which he found in education. He was hired as the President of Colorado College, where he stayed until he retired in 2011. Today he sits on many boards and is active in consulting and fund raising. One of his major projects is the United States Olympic & Paralympic Museum opening in Colorado Springs in 2020.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Governor Richard Celeste oral history, part 2.In part 2 Governor Celeste covers working in the Indian Embassy in the 1960s up through his time in the Ohio House of Representatives. Richard Celeste was born in 1937 in Cleveland, Ohio to Margaret and Frank Celeste. He graduated magna cum laude from Yale University and received the Rhodes Scholarship to Exeter College at Oxford before going to work for the Peace Corp. He served as special assistant to Chester Bowles while Bowles was the United States Ambassador to India. After his time in India he returned to the United States and worked for a short time as a teacher before running for the Ohio House of Representatives. He was elected to the Ohio House of Representatives from Cuyahoga County in 1970 and became the Lieutenant Governor under Jim Rhodes in 1974. He lost the Governor's race in 1978 and took the job as director of the Peace Corps from 1979 to 1981. He ran for and was elected as Governor in 1982, he won again in 1986 against Jim Rhodes who had defeated him previously. While governor, Celeste increased support for mental health & addiction services, funding for education, children services including providing onsite daycare for state employees, and human services as a whole. Before Celeste, Ohio was near the bottom among states in providing these programs. He opened government positions to African Americans and women. In fact, his administration posted more women to cabinet positions than all prior governors combined. Under his leadership state employee unions were allowed to negotiate wages and benefits in addition to working conditions. At the end of his second term he commuted several prisoners death sentences to life terms, including granting clemency to 25 female prisoners who had committed crimes because they were victims of domestic abuse. He went to work in consulting, but he big question of what do you do after being governor wasn't answered until 1997 when President Bill Clinton appointed him ambassador to India. His previous experience with Chester Bowles in India made him an excellent fit for the position. He returned home in 2001 looking for a new challenge, which he found in education. He was hired as the President of Colorado College, where he stayed until he retired in 2011. Today he sits on many boards and is active in consulting and fund raising. One of his major projects is the United States Olympic & Paralympic Museum opening in Colorado Springs in 2020.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Governor Richard Celeste oral history, part 4.In part 4 Governor Celeste covers the fallout of the savings and loan crisis, his second term as Governor, figuring out what to do next, being Ambassador to India, his time as president of Colorado College, and his reflections and advice. Richard Celeste was born in 1937 in Cleveland, Ohio to Margaret and Frank Celeste. He graduated magna cum laude from Yale University and received the Rhodes Scholarship to Exeter College at Oxford before going to work for the Peace Corp. He served as special assistant to Chester Bowles while Bowles was the United States Ambassador to India. After his time in India he returned to the United States and worked for a short time as a teacher before running for the Ohio House of Representatives. He was elected to the Ohio House of Representatives from Cuyahoga County in 1970 and became the Lieutenant Governor under Jim Rhodes in 1974. He lost the Governor's race in 1978 and took the job as director of the Peace Corps from 1979 to 1981. He ran for and was elected as Governor in 1982, he won again in 1986 against Jim Rhodes who had defeated him previously. While governor, Celeste increased support for mental health & addiction services, funding for education, children services including providing onsite daycare for state employees, and human services as a whole. Before Celeste, Ohio was near the bottom among states in providing these programs. He opened government positions to African Americans and women. In fact, his administration posted more women to cabinet positions than all prior governors combined. Under his leadership state employee unions were allowed to negotiate wages and benefits in addition to working conditions. At the end of his second term he commuted several prisoners death sentences to life terms, including granting clemency to 25 female prisoners who had committed crimes because they were victims of domestic abuse. He went to work in consulting, but he big question of what do you do after being governor wasn't answered until 1997 when President Bill Clinton appointed him ambassador to India. His previous experience with Chester Bowles in India made him an excellent fit for the position. He returned home in 2001 looking for a new challenge, which he found in education. He was hired as the President of Colorado College, where he stayed until he retired in 2011. Today he sits on many boards and is active in consulting and fund raising. One of his major projects is the United States Olympic & Paralympic Museum opening in Colorado Springs in 2020.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Governor Richard Celeste oral history, part 3.In part 3 Governor Celeste covers his second term in the Ohio House of Representatives, his time as Lieutenant Governor and Governor, and ending with the savings and loan crisis. Richard Celeste was born in 1937 in Cleveland, Ohio to Margaret and Frank Celeste. He graduated magna cum laude from Yale University and received the Rhodes Scholarship to Exeter College at Oxford before going to work for the Peace Corp. He served as special assistant to Chester Bowles while Bowles was the United States Ambassador to India. After his time in India he returned to the United States and worked for a short time as a teacher before running for the Ohio House of Representatives. He was elected to the Ohio House of Representatives from Cuyahoga County in 1970 and became the Lieutenant Governor under Jim Rhodes in 1974. He lost the Governor's race in 1978 and took the job as director of the Peace Corps from 1979 to 1981. He ran for and was elected as Governor in 1982, he won again in 1986 against Jim Rhodes who had defeated him previously. While governor, Celeste increased support for mental health & addiction services, funding for education, children services including providing onsite daycare for state employees, and human services as a whole. Before Celeste, Ohio was near the bottom among states in providing these programs. He opened government positions to African Americans and women. In fact, his administration posted more women to cabinet positions than all prior governors combined. Under his leadership state employee unions were allowed to negotiate wages and benefits in addition to working conditions. At the end of his second term he commuted several prisoners death sentences to life terms, including granting clemency to 25 female prisoners who had committed crimes because they were victims of domestic abuse. He went to work in consulting, but he big question of what do you do after being governor wasn't answered until 1997 when President Bill Clinton appointed him ambassador to India. His previous experience with Chester Bowles in India made him an excellent fit for the position. He returned home in 2001 looking for a new challenge, which he found in education. He was hired as the President of Colorado College, where he stayed until he retired in 2011. Today he sits on many boards and is active in consulting and fund raising. One of his major projects is the United States Olympic & Paralympic Museum opening in Colorado Springs in 2020.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Robert Spencer oral historyRobert Spencer was born in 1935 in Miami, Florida. He grew up in the Liberty City community. After graduating high school he went into the Army and trained in the Military Police. He deployed to Vietnam from 1971-72 with 101st Airborne as an MP and was stationed at Camp Eagle. He spent time stationed in the Panama Canal area and was assigned to Walter Reed for metabolic testing. He was later sent to work in Germany. After the Army he came home and worked in security and in education for many years.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Thomas Stormer oral historyThomas Stormer was born in 1946 in Cincinnati, Ohio. He was studying at the pharmacy college at the University of Cincinnati in 1963 when he decided to drop out and reassess his direction. Within two weeks he received his draft notice from the government. He enlisted for three years as a 71B, or clerk typist. He was sent to his basic training at Fort Benning, Georgia and went to his advanced individual training at Fort Polk, Louisiana. He spent time as an instructor at Fort Polk, but by 1968 he was sent to Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam. He was sent from there to a smaller less secure base, Qui Nhon Airfield, on the beach. There he was in charge of manpower tables, or assigning incoming soldiers to the areas they'd be stationed. He returned from Vietnam and went back to college on the GI Bill and got a job with the Cincinnati School System. Later he went back to school and became a respiratory therapist.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Albert Horn oral historyAt the age of 20, Albert Horn committed himself to giving back to his nation through military service. In 1942 at the age of 20 he enlisted in the United States Navy. He choose the Navy based on his father's stories of his time in the Army, and his brother was already a Seabees. During his basic training he came down with German measles, quarantined, and missed shipping out with his original group. Horn was then sent to the 8th Naval District based in Galveston, Texas where he was part of the shore patrol. Once they were put into permanent quarters he was reassigned to supplying food to the lighter than air bases. Ultimately he was place on the USS Lucidor AF-45, a quartermaster ship. In May 1946 he took his discharge. He got a job with the Criminal Investigations Division of the Internal Revenue Service. In 1967, Horn relocated to Bryan, Ohio where he established the Bryan Area Foundation. In 1972, he joined the Bryan Cameron Community Hospital’s board of directors. His vision helped the hospital show a profit and embrace growth and technology. He managed levies for Bryan City Schools and the City of Bryan police and fire departments. He was chairman of the Bryan Board of Public Affairs.Oral History at Ohio Memory
James Mimms oral historyJames (Jimmy) Mimms was born in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1945. He was drafted into the United States Army. His basic training was at Fort Benning, Georgia where he joined the 82nd Airborne. He attended infantry training at Fort Gordon before returning to Fort Benning for Jump training. He ultimately was deployed to Vietnam as part of the 173rd Airborne. He was part of various combat and recon missions before returning to the United States. In his interview he describes the draft process, his basic and advanced training, and his place in the civil rights movement before joining the Army. Mimms shares a story about retrieving the body of a white soldier and the conflict that caused. He relates the story of an ambush where three men were lost and how their squad fought their way back in to get them. He speaks a lot about his pride about being a soldier, the idea of America as home and though it's flawed he loves it and wants it to be better, and racism in the country today. He reflects on his early life working aboard the Steamship the Delta Queen, how the military changed him, and what it is important to know about veterans.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Edwin Smith oral historyEdwin Smith was born in 1923 in Grove City, Ohio. He entered the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1942 and recalls hearing of the bombing of Pearl Harbor while sitting in a soda shop with his wife after church. He spent three and a half years flying B-24 missions in the South Pacific. After the war he returned home to Grove City to raise a family. He became one of the first foot carriers for the U.S. Postal Service and played in many bands throughout central Ohio for over thirty years. In his interview he talks about joining the U.S. Army Air Corp., his training at Kelly field in San Antonio, and his family's history of military service. He discusses shipping out and flying to his new post at Johnston Island Air Force Base on Johnston Atoll where they had to deal with snakes, snipers, and kamikaze. He was moved to Hawaii where they had a semi-permanent base. He explains life on the islands and talks about some of his "snooper" missions, losing a member of the crew, and some of the enemy attacks of the island by "washing machine Charlie." Smith recalls the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the missions he was flying at the time. He was stationed on Okinawa when the Japanese arrived to surrender and he recalls his memories of their visit. He discusses his return to Ohio and details his band days when he played in and around central Ohio. Smith wraps up by talking of Grove City from the 40s, 50s, and 60s.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Thomas Shafer oral historyThomas Shafer was born in 1916 in Columbus, Ohio. Shafer was drafted into the ground crew of the United States Army Air Forces on June 5, 1942 at Fort Hayes. In his interview he talks about growing up in Gallia County and his return to Columbus to "seek fame and fortune" where he worked at a grill, as an electrician at Olentangy Park, at the Lazarus Department Store, and at an insurance company. He discusses the draft, his induction into the Army Air Forces, his work as a prisoner guard, and training at Keesler Ari Force Base. He describes a dental problem that caused him to miss shipping out with his classmates, traveling to Mitchel field to continue his training, and life as a soldier on Long Island. He relates his boat trip to England, the bomber escorts that were necessary to protect them from German U-boat attacks, and arriving in England where he had to wait until they finished the runways before they could begin their work. His job was to prepare P-47s fighters, and later P-51s, to escort bombing missions. His plane was OC-K named "Uni" for his pilot's girlfriend. He talked about what he did with his time off, the good-luck charms on planes, and helping to train pilots on the new P-51s. He describes the pilot he worked for, taking a trip to what was left of Germany, D-Day, and air raids. He explains how he received the bronze star, his reunions after the war, and the importance of clearing spark plugs. He concludes his interview talking about returning home, an airplane crash, and meeting his wife.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Ronald Buchanan oral historyRonald Buchanan was born in 1942 in Addyston, Ohio. He was drafted into the United States Army in 1966. His basic training was at Fort Knox followed by his MOS, Communications Center Specialist, training at Fort Gordon, GA. He was deployed to 1st Signal Brigade at Phu Lam, Vietnam. There he was promoted to sergeant before being transferred to Dong Ha shortly before going to his final post with the 43rd Signal Battalion in Chu Lai. Upon his return he worked in the criminal justice system as a security officer and instructor. He reenlisted in the Army Reserves retiring in 2001. In his interview he talks about growing up in southern Ohio, his family's military heritage, and what he was doing before he was drafted. He summarizes his draft, training, and posts in Vietnam before detailing what his life and work were like while deployed. He never felt like he was in danger until after the start of the Tet Offensive, which changed the character of the war. He tells of returning to the United States and finishing off his time in a transportation division in Virginia. He returns to Cincinnati where he gets his masters in criminal justice and works in security and as an adjunct professor. He returns to the Army in 1982 as part of the Army Reserves serving in and training military police units. He discusses his retirement in 2001 and reflects on his military service.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Aubrey & Nelson Page oral historyThomas Nelson Page, who goes by Nelson, was born in Royal Oak, Michigan in 1987. Aubrey Page, his wife was born in 1987 in Idaho Falls, Idaho where her father worked for the Naval Nuclear Laboratory. Nelson attended the Virginia Military Institute focusing on training for the Army infantry and studying mechanical Engineering. It was his goal to join the Army as an Infantryman, but he was assigned to an engineering battalion. Aubrey attended Mary Baldwin University in the Virginia Women’s Institute for Leadership and her ROTC courses were held at the Virginia Military Institute. Aubrey and Nelson met and became engaged during their time at school. Aubrey was the first to graduate and was quickly deployed aboard the USS Porter (DDG-78) as a Surface Warfare Officer. Upon her return she and Nelson were married before he was deployed. Nelson was deployed to Afghanistan at Forward Operating Base Sharana as part of the 92nd Engineer Battalion. He was home for a year while he worked in Georgia and participated in training at Fort Irwin. He was then deployed again to the Kandahar Province for nine months where he was responsible for deconstructing Army installations in preparation for the withdrawal from Afghanistan. Aubrey was then assigned to the USS Gettysburg (GC-64) as a navigator and participated in Exercise Joint Warrior off the coast of Scotland. After these deployments, they both left the active military and transferred to the reserves.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Dennis Schultice oral historyDennis B. Schultice was born in Caldwell, Ohio in 1946. His father, a World War II veteran, was highly influential throughout his life and service. He trained as a meat cutter and left home to pursue his career. His first letter from home contained his draft notice and he enlisted in the United States Army as a cook. He trained at Fort Knox and deployed to Germany with 81st Field Artillery Regiment in 1965. He ran the mess and was responsible for cooking in the field. Schultice's last nine months were spent at Fort Hayes in Columbus, Ohio as the personal cook for the base commander. He went on to have various civilian jobs in the food service industry, retiring from Aramark Food Services.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Thomas Hayes oral historyThomas Hayes was born in Zanesville, Ohio in March of 1949. He enlisted in the United States Air Force and was trained as an Aerospace Control and Warning Systems Operator, or Scope Dope. He was stationed at McChord, King Salmon, Cheyenne Mountain, and Malmstrom Air Force Bases. In his interview, he talks about his family's history of military service, why he chose to join the Air Force, and how he became an aerospace control officer. He describes his training, the different locations he worked, an average day for a scope dope, and what he did in his free time. Hayes discusses his time on the Air Force honor guard, monitoring a hijacking, the constant failure of training, and an exciting ride in a helicopter. He explains what he liked about working at the King Salmon Air Force Base, what he did after leaving the Air Force, and his brother's experience in the Navy. He concludes by talking about how his military experience changed him, what people should know about airmen, flying under the radar, and Air Force camaraderie.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Dwight Davis oral historyDwight Davis was born in Central West Virginia in February of 1922. He moved to Akron, Ohio as a young man and went to work for the Goodyear Aircraft Corporation. When Goodyear found that Davis wished to enlist they released him to be drafted by the United States Air Force. After his cadet training, he was assigned as a tail gunner to the 8th Air Force, 94th Bombardment Group flying in B-17s. On a mission over Munich, Germany his plane was shot down and he was taken prisoner. Davis spent the rest of the war being moved around to various POW camps. After the war, he had the honor of meeting Dwight Eisenhower, twice, and returned to the United States where he studied psychology at West Virginia University. He went to work at the International Harvester Company as a service technician and settled in Columbus, Ohio.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Michael & Regina Quinn oral historyRegina Quinn was born in November of 1930 to a family with a significant military tradition. Her older brother, a military veteran, swore her into the Army in December of 1952. Regina went to Fort Benning, Georgia where she trained to be a nurse. Michael Quinn was born at Fort Sam Houston in 1928. His father was an Army Colonel and a Japanese POW in the Philippines during World War II. Michael joined the Marine Reserves where he served for two years before he was accepted to the ROTC program at the University of Kansas. He was shortly enlisted in both branches before his commander found out and he left the Marines. He transferred to Fort Benning, Georgia so that he would be eligible to be deployed to Korea. While he was there he trained at the Airborne and Ranger Schools. At Fort Benning Regina and Michael met and got married before Michael was transferred to Japan with the 187th Infantry Regiment. Regina worked as an Army nurse in Fukuoka, Japan and at Camp Wood until her pregnancy progressed to the point she couldn't wear her uniform. Michael served as the P and A officer until he returned to the United States and National Guard in 1955. His employer, Proctor and Gamble, transferred him to Columbus, Ohio where he joined the Army Reserves Special Forces. Michael and Regina have continued the tradition of military service through their children and grandchildren, many of whom are still serving today.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Phillip Hinson oral historyPhillip J. Hinson was born in 1982 in Westlake, Ohio. Hinson was part of the Air Force ROTC program at The Ohio State University from 2001 to 2006 when he graduated with a degree in civil engineering. In his interview Hinson talks about his childhood and his family's history of military service. He discusses why he chose to enter the Air Force, his time in the Air Force ROTC at The Ohio State University, and his first duty station. He explains what he learned at his first station, the changes in the Air Force at the time, and why he decided to volunteer to go to South Korea. Hinson describes his job at Kunsan Ari Base, what the culture was like on Base, some of the things he got to do while there, and a prank he pulled as he left to return to the states. He recalls getting his assignment to deploy to Gardez, Afghanistan, the MRAP (Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected) truck bomb incident, the importance of the respect he got serving with Army "grunts," and his decision not to re-enlist. Hinson returns to Little Rock Air Force Base where he spends the last 6 months of active duty. He discusses his final duty station, what he wanted to do for work, and how he ended up at the Columbus VA hospital. He concludes by talking about some of the items he donated to the Ohio History Connection, the values of the Air Force, veterans' organizations that he belongs to, and what civilians should know about those who serve.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Burt Logan oral historyBurt Logan was born in 1954 in Rutherfordton, North Carolina. Logan attended the United States Military Academy at West Point. He chose the Field Artillery Branch and after graduating West Point moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma for Officer Basic Training. He was assigned to the 1st Infantry Division, or the Big Red "1", and was stationed at Fort Riley, Kansas. He served as a Forward Observer, Commander for a Reconnaissance and Survey Platoon, Service Battery Commander, and Assistant S-4. After finishing his five years with the Army he resigned his commission to follow his interest in history to the museum field.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Marvin Shrimplin oral historyMarvin Shrimplin was born in Marion, Ohio in June of 1942. Rather than be drafted he enlisted in the United States Army Field Artillery School. He trained on 105mm Howitzers at Fort Sill in Oklahoma and found that he was good at fire direction center, which became his position on the field artillery team. Shrimplin was deployed to Quảng Yên, Vietnam with the 7th Battalion, 13th Field Artillery. He was stationed at LZ Hammond and moved to temporary camps from there wherever artillery support was needed. Upon his return, he served as a protocol officer at Fort Knox, Kentucky. After leaving the Army he got a computer-programming job with Nationwide Insurance and settled in the Columbus, Ohio Area.Oral History at Ohio Memory
James McDaniel oral historyJames R. McDaniel was born in 1945 in Evansville, Indiana. He left home to attend Indiana State University, but after several years decided he needed a change. In August of 1965 he joined the Navy. He attended boot camp and was accepted to the Naval Nuclear Power School. He was temporarily assigned to the USS Arneb on routine operations in the Caribbean before transferring to the USS Skate, a nuclear submarine. During his time on the Skate they were primarily deployed in the Mediterranean and took several trips to the Arctic.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Ruby Gilliam oral historyRuby C. Gilliam was born in 1922 in Neon, Kentucky. Gilliam joined the United States Naval Women's Reserves (WAVES) after the death of her first husband, Darwin Caudill, in WWII. She was stationed in Washington D.C. where she worked for the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery as a data entry professional. She used computers to record the names of servicemen who were killed or wounded. After the war, she remarried and moved with her husband to the Canton, Ohio area. She has been very active in politic working for the State Treasurer, Directing the Carroll County Board of Elections, and is on the Executive Board of the Ohio Democratic Party. In 2016 she was the oldest delegate to attend the Democratic National Convention where she had the honor of leading the Pledge of Allegiance.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Joseph Byrne oral historyJoseph H. Byrne was born in 1932 in Columbus, Ohio. He was drafted into the Army in November of 1952 as support for the Korean War. After 18 weeks of training at Camp Breckenridge, Kentucky he was sent to Korea with the 7th Division Mortar Platoon, 1stBattalion. He was stationed on the 38th parallel in an active combat zone, because of this, he was able to return to the United States within 9 months. He returned to Fort Carson, Colorado where he was discharged. He has an amazingly positive viewpoint of a difficult time in his life.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Alexander Kosta oral historyAlexander P. Kosta was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey in 1921. Kosta enlisted in the Army Air Corps. On April 8, 1945. He flew 35 combat missions, 15 of which he acted as the squadron lead navigator, and was part of the St. Lo Breakthrough during Operation Cobra. In his Interview he talks about his childhood, enlisting in the Army Air Corps and his navigator training at Ellington Field. He explains the three-seat training method, his test to be qualified as a navigator, and how they prepped the planes for combat. Kosta described how they celebrated a successful mission, the only injuries sustained on his aircraft during the war, and how they kept the tail gunner’s windscreen clean. He discussed what they did for fun on their time off, staying in touch after the war, and how they earned extra cash testing repaired B-17s. He relates how they learned to use a parachute during basic training, inviting British children who had been sent to the country to their Christmas party, and how they kept warm during their ten-hour flights. He concludes by discussing his return home, what he did after the war, firing the machine guns, and working with English pilots. He related working in the personnel office at Ellington Air Base, how he became an Ohioan, and clarified some of the roles of a navigator. He concludes by talking about what people today do not know about his military experience, what people should no about veterans, and why he chose not to reenlist.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Jennifer Isenstadt oral historyJennifer Serene Isenstadt enlisted in the Navy in 2005 as an Information Systems Technician. Isenstadt talks about growing up in a Navy family that moved often, her father’s job in the Navy, and why she chose to join the Navy. She describes her enlistment process, the choice to be stationed at Naval Support Activity Naples in Italy, and seeing people and places from her childhood. She tells the story of finding her roommate dead on her first day in Naples and how that affected her. Isenstadt discusses her daily routine, the different positions she held, and how having a personal computer opened up the transgender community to her, but turned her into a recluse. She relates how she felt when she found that her next position was going to be on a ship, being order to talk to a therapist, and how that lead to her being medically discharged from the Navy. Isenstadt recalls how her mother gave her a new name, what it was like to be able to herself outside the Navy, and how she realized that she had issues beyond her gender. She talks about the troubles she had saving for her transition surgery, how the Veterans Administration helped her reach her goals, and what she thinks is most important to know about those who serve in the military. Isenstadt remembers her first 4th of July in Italy and some trips she took around Italy. She concludes by talking about her life now and working as Peer Support with the MY Recovery Works non-profit.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Tim Barker oral historyTim Barker was born in 1956 in Portsmouth, Ohio. Barker joined the Navy in 1974 looking to broaden his experiences and see the world beyond his hometown. In his interview Barker talks about growing up in a small town, his family’s history of military service, and why he joined the United States Navy. He discusses his basic training, specializing in electronics and communications, and what it was like to serve aboard the USS Hancock. He describes his job, what he did for fun when they were in port, some of the exotic places he got to visit, and what still reminds him of being on a ship. Barker explains what it was like to serve with jet pilots, the lead-up to their mission in Vietnam, and Operations Eagle Pull and Frequent Wind. He relates a story of meeting one of the people who had been evacuated aboard the USS Hancock during the operations, how this affected his view of his service, and what it was like when the ship returned from its last voyage. Barker reviews his next assignment at Machrihanish as part of a NATO operation, what it was like living in Scotland, and why he choose not to reenlist. He concludes by talking about his life after the Navy, how his service changed him, what he would want people today to know about those who served, and his continuing work with veterans organizations.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Peter Mansoor oral historyDr. Peter Mansoor was born in New Ulm, Minnesota in 1960. He attended the United States Military Academy at West Point and graduated first in his class in 1982. His service culminated when he took the position as the Executive Officer to Commanding General Petraeus during the Surge in Iraq from 2007 to 2008. In his interview, he talked about his childhood in New Ulm, Minnesota, his schooling at the Military War College in West Point, and choosing to be an Armored Cavalry Officer. He reflects on being stationed at Fort Hood where he met his wife, being on the Inter-German Border when the iron curtain came down, attending graduate school at Ohio States University, and returning to West Point to teach. He explains what it was like to work at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, his job as the special assistant to the Director for Strategic Plans and Policy, his time in Kuwait as part of Operation Desert Spring. He describes his command style, his memories of 9/11, his time at the Army War College, and moving to a command position in Freiburg, Germany. He explains why the Rear Detachment is so important, preparing for the deployment to Iraq in 2003, how he dealt with mortar fire, and his toughest command decision. He discusses the rumors of Weapons of Mass Destruction, the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Iraq, and his relationship with the Coalition Provisional Authority. He talks about the death of his Sergeant Major to a roadside bomb, reaching out to Iraqis and the tribes, some good memories, and their return to Germany. Mansoor recalls his time as a Senior Military fellow in New York, his move to the council of colonels, and how they couldn’t get past the problem of Iraq. He moves on to discuss the various groups working on solutions to Iraq, how the surge became the chosen strategy, and finding his role as Executive Officer to Commanding General David Petraeus. He shares a story about a poker-chip necklace he wore during his time in Iraq, what David Petraeus was like to work with, their battle rhythm, solving the problem of detention centers that were virtual “jihadist universities”, and his limited interactions with Iraqis during this deployment. He describes how the continued support for Nouri al-Maliki was a bad choice, how Tower 57 was secured, how the surge really took hold with Operation Phantom Thunder, how things might have been done differently, and leaving the military behind. Mansoor concludes by talking about the things that remind him of his military experience, some of his family “lore,” how his military experience changed his life, and what people should know about those who serve.Oral History at Ohio Memory
John E. Flinn oral historyJohn E. Flinn was born in 1948 in Akron, Ohio. He enlisted in the United States Army in 1968 and was assigned to the 148th Infantry Platoon Scout Dogs under the 196th Infantry Brigade. In his interview he talks about growing up the son of a Baptist minister, his rebellious nature, and how enrolling in the University of Akron lead to him enlisting in the military. He discusses his enlistment process and how he almost ended up being a marine, his basic training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, and his advanced infantry training at Fort Polk, Louisiana. Flinn recalls enjoying the Army culture and training, his plan to get placed in a casual company to become a clerk or typist, and how he was assigned to scout dog training. He remembers that despite his attempts he was sent to Vietnam as a scout dog handler, his first look at the worn men returning from Vietnam, and moving to LZ Hawk Hill. He explains how he was bitten by one of the scout dogs and sent to the convalescent center at Cam Ranh Bay, what they did for fun at Cam Ranh Bay, and being hit by a mortar blast. He talks about his return from convalescence to find himself at the top of the roster to go on a mission, how his first mission ended in a battle, and how he earned his Combat Action Badge. He describes various missions where he walked point for companies, several firefights, and as his time in Vietnam grew short worrying that he would not make it home. He relates that attitude he encountered when he returned to the States and how survivor’s guilt pushed him to live a life on the edge that included regular drug use, prison, and a stay in a mental institution. Flinn discusses getting assistance from the Veterans Administration that helped him cope with his Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, and becoming involved with veterans organizations. He concludes by talking about how he dealt with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, the similarities and differences of veterans, and what people should know about those who serve.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Edwin Medina oral historyEdwin Medina was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1979. He enlisted in the Army in 2000 and specialized as a Personnel Sergeant doing workforce planning. In his interview Medina talks about his childhood in Columbus, OH and San Juan, his family’s history of military service, and why he chose to enlist. He describes his basic training at Fort Knox, his military occupation specialty, and being stationed at Fort Leonard Wood. He explains how he was deployed with the 5th Engineer Battalion, what it was like being the SAW Gunner of a Quick Reaction Force, and what his unit’s mission. Medina discusses his unit’s northward movement to K-2, working with the Iraqis, what communication was like back home, and what they did during their downtime. He relates what it was like coming back to the states, why he decided not to reenlist, his trouble adjusting to civilian life, and what he did after he got home. He explains how his military service changed him, what advice he would give his sons if they wanted to enlist, how he feels about his service in Iraq, and his involvement in veterans’ organizations. He concludes by talking about civilian support of veterans, the sacrifices of being in the military, and his memories of 9/11.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Cassandra Merrill oral historyCassandra Merrill was born in Portland, Oregon in 1982. She enlisted the United States Army Reserves in 2005 in order to serve her country. Merrill was assigned to the 12th PSYOP Battalion as a Psychological Operations Multimedia Specialist. She was responsible for winning the hearts and minds of the Iraqi people through positive messaging and product distribution. Merrill was deployed to Jordan in 2008, Iraq from 2008 to 2009, and North Carolina from 2009 to 2012 where she was a PSYOPs trainer.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Gina Freeman oral historyDr. Gina Freeman was born in 1956 in Springfield, Ohio. A high school guidance counselor told her that she wasn’t college material; looking for other opportunities she was inspired by her father and uncle’s military stories to join the Army. In her interview she talks about her family, their tradition of military service, and why she joined the United States Army. She discusses her Basic Training at Fort Jackson, being stationed at Fort Benning, the cultural stereotypes of women in the Army, and why most women were there. She describes her work with kids at her “Gymcana”, taking college courses, and some of the important relationships she developed. Freeman explains her decision not to reenlist and why she joined the Air Force reserves. She reflects back on receiving the Commendation Medal, the differences between World War II and Vietnam War veterans, her time in the All-Army women’s basketball league, and how her military experiences prepared her for her work with kids today. Freeman describes the change from the Women’s Army Corp to an integrated Army, how she feels about women in combat roles, and why she ultimately left the Air Force Reserves. She concludes by talking about what people should know about those who serve, the things today that remind her of her service, and how the Army changed her.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Joshua Jacob Hoffman oral historyJoshua Jacob Hoffman was born in 1963 in Columbus, Ohio. Hoffman joined the United States Air Force in 1984 after two years as a Mormon missionary in Los Angeles. In his interview he describes what it was like to start working in high school, his move to Kentucky, and becoming popular in school. He discusses is Mormon Missionary work in Los Angeles, how he reconciled his sexuality with the teachings of the Mormon Church, and what it was like to live in a big city after coming from rural Kentucky. Hoffman explains when and why he decided he wanted to join the military, how he selected the Air Force, and his enlistment process. He talks about his basic training at Lackland Air Force Base, his first assignment to bench-stock at Williams Air Force Base in Arizona, and what his life was like in Arizona. Hoffman recounts the harassment that began when someone new was put in charge of his management and how it turned into an ongoing series of abuses. He shares how an anonymous tip got him questioned by the Office of Special Investigations and eventually led to a Less Than Honorably Discharged under the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy. Hoffman recalls the loss of not only his job, but also his friends, family, and community. Hoffman describes life after the Air Force, beginning to put things back together, and eventually returning to Columbus, Ohio to be closer to his grandmother. In 2015 with support from his husband and letters from friends Hoffman was able to have his discharge reclassified as Honorable. He talks about his life now, the problems he still faces, and reflects on his military service.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Dennis Laich oral historyDennis Laich was born in New Brighton, Pennsylvania in 1949. Laich enrolled in the United States Army Reserve Officer Training Corp in 1971 while going to college on a football scholarship. He spent 35 years in the Army Reserve attaining the rank of Major General. In his interview, Laich talks about his family's tradition of military service and their issues with him becoming an officer, how he found his specialization, and the problems with sending officers overseas. He discusses the biggest challenges of United States security, fighting an asymmetrical war, winning the hearts and minds of the United State's enemies, and his thoughts on the support we provide for veterans. Laich recalls his time with the 94th Regional Readiness Command, how training in and the political culture of the military has changed, and his involvement with the repeal of don't ask, don't tell. He describes his involvement with the Patriots Program at Ohio Dominican University, the All-Volunteer Force Forum, and his thoughts on how military enrollment should change, and how being a Major General offers a different perspective. He concludes by talking about the story of a donation he made of a sword and bowl to the Ohio History Connection, how his military experience has changed him, and providing veterans a voice through the Ohio Veterans Memorial and Museum.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Johnny Dawson oral historyJohnny Dawson was born in Columbus in 1985. Dawson joined the United States Marine Corps in 2003, directly from high school. In his interview, he discusses his decision to join the Marines, his basic and advanced individual training, his forward operating base in Hit, Iraq, and the mission to win hearts and minds. Dawson explains his unit's first combat loss, his war mentality, poor leadership decisions, their combat rules during his first and second engagement, and how he got a ticket for not wearing his seatbelt. He talks about his experiences at the Battle of Fallujah, a shepherd boy who helped them secure a large cache of explosives, Mojave Viper training at Twentynine Palms, and why he volunteered to return to Iraq. Dawson describes the people he worked with during his second deployment, meeting Chris Kyle the Navy Seal sniper, his duties working with the 7th command, and how an improvised explosive device injured him. He recounts his decision to go to college, learning about finance business, interning with the Secret Service, and deciding to work for Edward Jones. Dawson recalls his troubles with post-traumatic stress disorder, his religious beliefs, thought of suicide, and what he feels civilians should know about the people who serve. He concludes by talking about the chain of command, how his experiences changed him, how to help those with PTSD, and his thoughts about fate.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Paul Craft oral historyPaul Craft was born in 1965 in Virginia Beach, Virginia. He enlisted in the United States Marine Reserves In 1983 and commissioned into the Army National Guard in 1986. In his interview, he talks about why he joined the military, his military occupational specialty, his memories of 9/11, and his pre-deployment to Afghanistan. Craft describes Bagram Airfield, his day-to-day activities, what it's like clearing mines, and the adaptation to combat on a non-linear battlefield. He discusses what they did during their down-time, what it was like to serve with other coalition forces, Posttraumatic Stress Growth, and his reassignment as an artillery officer. Craft explains what it was like at the Joint Air Defense Operations Center in Washington DC, his responsibilities as the commander of ground-based missile defense, and what is was like working jointly with the United States Air Force. Craft goes on to speak of the skills he gained from his deployments, why transitioning back to civilian life was easy for him, and what people should know about the National Guard. He concludes by sharing a memory of an accidental explosion in Afghanistan, how he sees the National Guard fitting into the military as a whole, and how the immediacy of today's communications can be a problem for soldiers on the frontline.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Jason Dominguez oral historyJason Dominguez was born in Columbus in 1980. Dominguez was part of Lima Company in the 3rd Battalion of the 25th Marine Regiment that participated in more fighting than almost any other military unit and suffered heavy losses to combat. He worked as a Military and Veterans Affair Caseworker for Congressman Pat Tiberi and as Assistant Director of the Ohio Department of Veterans Services. In his interview, Dominguez talks about his family and their history of military service, his basic and advanced individual training, his memories of 9/11, and his graduation from The Ohio State University before deployment. He describes a typical combat scenario, his war journal, Operation New Market, and how he dealt with the deaths of soldiers close to him. He discusses Operation Matador, what it was like to be shot at, the fighting in Al Khan, and David Camp's rescue of three Marines. Dominguez reflects on how he feels about his service, how his combat experiences changed him, what it all meant, and his most important contribution. He speaks of what he would do in his free time, communicating with his family, his sister's wedding, his pre-deployment, and watching mortars explode near Haditha Dam. He recounts his return home, meeting Vice President Dick Cheney, the loss of two close friends, and pushing back against despair. He concludes by talking about his experiences with PTSD, the Battle of Haditha, and why he would do it all again.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Stephen Snyder-Hill oral historyAs part of an ongoing effort to document service experiences in the modern era, the Ohio History Connection presents Standing Together: Ohio Veterans and the War on Terror. This project was conducted in 2015 and includes members of the United States Army, Air Force and Marines serving in full-time and reservist capacities. Stephen Snyder-Hill was born October 21, 1970. He was a soldier in the United States Army, and is currently an author, lecturer, and LGBT rights activist. He served under the United States Army's Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy and fought against the Defense of Marriage Act in collaboration with Freedom to Marry and the Service members Legal Defense Network. He is the author of Soldier of Change: From the Closet to the Forefront of the Gay Rights Movement. Snyder-Hill enlisted in the United States Army in 1988. He deployed with the 1st Armored Division to the Persian Gulf War in Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Kuwait before his honorable discharge in 1996. He enlisted in the Army Reserves 2001 and was deployed to Iraq in 2010. In order to serve he had to go back into the closet because of the Army's don't ask, don't tell policy. He came under scrutiny during his deployment, and ultimately came out, when he sent a question to republican presidential candidates during a debate asking whether they would "circumvent the progress that's been made for gay and lesbian soldiers in the military".Oral History at Ohio Memory
Peter Zoretic oral historyPeter D. Zoretic was born in 1962 in Columbus, Ohio. He graduated from The Ohio State University with a degree in Aviation Management and Operations and joined the United States Marine Corp to become a pilot. In his interview Zoretic talks about growing up in Columbus, his parents, attending OSU, and his decision to join the Marine Corp. He discusses his officer training, his aviation school, what it was like moving all over the country for training, and living in Hawaii. He explains his first deployment to Saudi Arabia, working as an Operations Officer, the job of a Marine pilot, and what it is like flying a multi-crew aircraft. Zoretic describes how he became a recruiter, the importance of rising to challenges to making rank, and being an on-ship Navy liaison. He recounts being part of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, training for night flying, the mission to secure Camp Rhino in Afghanistan, and flying prisoners from Tora Bora. He speaks of coming back home, working as an operations planner, the crisis action team, and pre-invasion planning for the Iraq War. He gives an overview of deploying to Camp Patriot, receiving and commanding a squadron, his questions about the military's goals, and working tsunami relief. Zoretic explains why he left the military, working for Medflight, returning to Afghanistan to work as a contractor, and flying Monarch 1 for Children's Hospital. He concludes by talking about what night-flying is like, his thought on military strategy in the Middle-East, managing violence as a Squadron Commander, retrieving a crashed Blackhawk, the rewards of service, and the future of the Marine Corp.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Marc Lopez oral historyMarc A. Lopez was born in 1975 in New York, NY. Lopez attended The United States Military Academy at West Point from 1993 to 1997. After graduating he joined the Armored Calvary where he served as a tank and scout platoon leader. In his interview, he talked about his family's military history, his reason for enrolling to West point, and why he chose the armored cavalry. He described his training at Fort Knox, working at Fort Hood, his memories of 9/11, and why he enjoyed his leadership position. He discusses his pre-deployment training, deploying to Kuwait, working with the Kuwaiti Army, his mission in Kuwait, and some examples of his daily life. Lopez explains what working in a tank is like, the hierarchy of tank positions, the kinds of activities he and his men did in their time off, and how problems at home could manifest during deployment. He goes on to speak of returning home, why he did not stay in the army, how his skills transferred into his civilian life, and how his perception of his service has changed over time. He concludes by talking about his views on how the army is changing, the use of drones, what people should know about those who serve, and the difficulties adjusting to civilian culture.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Richard V. Reynolds oral historyRichard V. Reynolds was born in 1949 in Aberdeen, Washington. He was commissioned into the United States Air Force after graduating from the Air Force Academy in 1971. In his interview, Reynolds talks about his childhood, attending the Air Force Academy, his initial assignment as an instructor on the T-38 Talon, and later as a pilot for the B-52 Stratofortress. He discusses attending the Air Force’s Test Pilot School, winning the Onizuka Prop Wash Award, working as a test pilot for the B-1 bomber, a tragic accident in the B-1, and his move to commander of the 4950 2nd Test Squadron. Reynolds explains working as a Deputy Program Director for the B-2 Stealth Bomber, a chance he had to show his appreciation for a friend, moving to and then back to the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, and some of the projects he worked on as the Commander of the Aeronautical Systems Center. Reynolds describes the period of heightened security after 9/11 and how that changed the Air Forces focus, what work he pursued after retiring in 2005, and what learned from all his experiences. He concludes by describing what it was like flying the stealth bomber, the parts of his career he most enjoyed, what it’s like being a General, the future of warfare, and the importance of the Ohio Veterans Memorial and Museum.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Allen Middaugh oral historyAllen Middaugh was born in Frankfurt, Germany in 1986. He enlisted in the United States Air Force in 2007 where he trained as an Explosive Ordinance Disposal technician, the most dangerous job in the military. In his interview, he talks about his family, his decision to join the Air Force, the enlistment process, and basic training. Middaugh discusses his memories of 9/11, training to be an Explosives Ordinance Disposal technician, his first position at Dover Air Force Base, working in the mortuary, and his duties as an explosives technician. He recounts his first uneventful deployment to Kuwait, training for his second deployment to Afghanistan in 2009, what are Improvised Explosive Devices, and his days working with various units. Middaugh describes the readjustment process after returning from combat, his short tour in South Korea, meeting his wife, and his third deployment. He continues to speak of working with the Afghan Border Police to certify their explosives technicians, the Afghan approach to bomb disposal, his personal experiences working with the Afghans, and the differences between this deployment and his previous deployments. He discusses his relationship with his wife, who was also an explosives technician, his return from deployment to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, his future flying drones, and what he thinks everyone should know about the people who choose to serve. He concludes by sharing stories about the Afghan Policeman he worked with, his trip to Vietnam, and working with anthropologists.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Tony Storey oral historyTony Storey was born in 1971 in Columbus, Ohio. He joined the United States Marine Corp in 1989 where he trained as an Infantryman. In his interview Storey talks about being a rebellious kid in Canal Winchester, Ohio, his parents, why he chose to join the Marine Corp, and his enlistment process. He describes why he chose the infantry, his basic training, an attempted suicide he witnessed, and his graduation from basic. He goes on to talk about his Military Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training, holidays at infantry school, and his deployment to Riyadh Air Base during Desert Storm. Storey explains the Desert Storm bombing campaigns, being out in the oil fields, and going to training to be a squad leader. He recounts his deployment to Somalia, the City of Baidoa (Baydhabo), Somalia, Christmas on the front line, and leading his squad. He describes returning home, difficulties finding work, and his perceptions of how civilians felt about those in military service. Storey reviews his decision to join the Marine Reserves, his memories of 9/11, and returning to active duty at Quantico. He continues to speak of his deployment to Iraq for security force training, working with the Iraqis, and his return home. He concludes by talking about how the perception of veterans has changed, his feelings about his service, and how that service affect his life.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Ruben Minor oral historyRuben A. Minor was born in Frankfurt, Germany in 1969. Minor signed up for the delayed entry program and entered the United States Navy in 1988. In his Interview, he talks about his family, why he joined the United States Navy, his role as a radioman, and what he liked and disliked about serving on a ship. Minor discusses his day-to-day activities, the ranking of bunks on a ship, the tradition of blanket parties, what people do during their time off, a scary moment in the Philippines, and Desert Storm. He speaks of moving from ship-life to shore-life, his experiences of racial discrimination, the change from enlisted man to an officer, and how he utilized his civilian skills in the Navy. Minor explains the values he gained from his service, what people should know about those who serve in the military, his trouble adjusting to civilian life, and what he would change about the military. He concludes by talking about the shellback initiation ceremony, homosexuality in the Navy, and drug culture.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Hilton Carter oral historyHilton Carter was born in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1928. He enlisted in the United States Army in 1946 and trained as an aircraft and engine mechanic. He was based on Guam where he worked on B-29s and C-119s. Later he moved to Lockbourne where he became one of the Tuskegee Airmen. In his interview Mr. Carter talks about his family, the reason for leaving New Orleans, discrimination in the South, and his trip to New York. He describes his first memories of New York City, the difficulties getting into school, and working on planes in New Jersey. Mr. Carter explains why he enlisted in the Army, training to work on the B-29 Superfortress, and traveling to Hawaii. He continues to discuss going to Guam, what life was like on the island, the military culture at Northwest Field, and some interactions with the Natives. He recounts how he came to be stationed at Lockbourne Army Air Base, his time working and living in New York, how he met his wife on Lockbourne Base, and his duties on the Base. Mr. Carter details his life after the Army, working and flying at North American Aviation and an accident in a C-119 Flying Boxcar. He reviews a trip that he took to Japan while on R&R, living in the jungles on Guam, and finding Japanese soldiers living in caves. He concludes by reflecting on how he feels about his service, discrimination, the civil rights movement, Lockbourne, and the benefits from being in the military.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Donald Elder oral historyDonald Elder was born in Columbus, Ohio in 1928. He enlisted in the United States Army Air Corps in March of 1946 at Fort Hayes in Columbus, Ohio six months before his eighteenth birthday. He trained as an aircraft and engine mechanic specializing on the P-47 Thunderbolt. In his interview, Mr. Elder talks about growing up in Columbus, his home life, his family's military service, and schooling. He shares the story of how he enlisted, the different bases he was at, how he felt about being in the Army, and basic training. Mr. Elder described his specialist training, what Lockbourne Air Force Base was like, and his experiences flying. He goes on to talk about his participation in President Truman's inaugural parade and being invited to attend President Barrack Obama's inauguration, leaving the Army, his work at Curtiss-Wright, and what he did for fun at that time. Mr. Elder explains his work at North American Aviation, becoming the first black crew chief, experiences with discrimination, and his time in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He discusses some of the jobs he's held after his retirement at North American, moving to Texas, his work with the speaker's bureau, and meeting President George W. Bush. Mr. Elder reviews how the Army shaped his life, discrimination in the South, and a riot that happened at Sheppard Army Air Force Base when first entered the Army. He concludes by reflecting on what he might have done differently and receiving the Congressional Gold Medal in 2007.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Cy Sedlacko oral historyCyril L. Sedlacko was born on July 3, 1924 in Campbell, Ohio the sixth of nine children born to Michael and Anna (Melek) Sedlacko who immigrated from what is now Slovakia. After graduating from Scienceville High School, he enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1943. In WWII, he was a paratrooper with 17th Airborne Division. He fought in the Battle of the Bulge and was part of the Bombing of Wesel, Germany. He was honorably discharged in December 1945 having earned the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart. After the war he worked at Truscon Steel in Youngstown. In 1949 he joined the Ohio National Guard where he served for 30 years before retiring as the state Recruiting and Retention Officer having earned the rank of colonel. He also served as the Battery Commander of Charlie Battery, 135th F.A. After retiring from military service, he worked for the Ohio Department of Commerce including time as the Deputy Chief of the Division of Licensing followed by time as the administrative assistant to Ohio’s Division of State Fire Marshall. In 1983, he became involved with the 37th Division Veterans Association (37th DVA) where he held numerous positions including President and its first Secretary/Treasurer, resigning in 2018 when he was 94. In 2009 he was inducted into the Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame. He was a member of the American Legion, MOAA, ONGA and the VFWOral History at Ohio Memory
Jack Forster oral historyJack Harold Foster was born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1948, and grew up in Cleveland and Parma. Forster’s father passed away when Forster was fifteen, and he worked full-time as a grocery clerk to support his family while attending high school. In June of 1967, three months shy of his graduation, Forster enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps. After training, he was assigned to the Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, Marine Regiment, Third Marine Division, India company stationed at Dong Ha in Quang Tri Province. His unit served in the field near the DMZ (demilitarized zone), at Camp Carroll during the Tet Offensive (1968), and at Khe Sanh, where Foster was wounded by shrapnel during a gunfight. Foster received medical care and convalesced at a field hospital at Phu Bai, on the hospital ship Repose, in Guam, and finally, at Bethesda Naval Hospital in Washington, D.C. He completed his service in North Carolina at Camp Lejeune. After his discharge, Forster earned a degree and worked in the computer industry. He also experienced prostate cancer connected to his exposure to Agent Orange in Vietnam, and has received treatment for PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). Today, Forster is active in veterans’ organizations and the campaign to help returned veterans find employment.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Larry Buehner oral historyBorn and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, Lawrence E. Buehner trained as a graphic designer at the Cleveland Institute of Art before he was drafted into the U.S. Army in the summer of 1969. Although Buehner's initial training - at Fort Campbell, Kentucky and Fork Polk, Louisiana - was under the MOS (Military Occupational Specialty) 11 Bravo, he opted to enroll in scout dog school during an assignment to Fort Benning, Georgia. In August of 1970, Buehner was deployed to Bien Hoa, South Vietnam as a part of the 37th Infantry Scout Dog Platoon, where he met his canine partner - a female German shepherd named Cali. Buehner and Cali worked closely together to protect men they accompanied into the field. However, as apart of President Nixon's 1971 "Vietnamization" policy, Buehner and other scout dog handlers were assigned to other units - Buehner to combat photography with the Public Information Office (PIO) of the First Air Cavalry Division - and never learned what happened to their beloved canine partners. Buehner's story reflects on his service in the war and relationship with his scout dog, as well as his transition to civilian life and ongoing effects of his service - including raising a son with disabilities tied to Buehner's exposure to Agent Orange in Vietnam, and his ongoing dedication to raising therapy dogs for weekly visits to the Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Administration Medical Center.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Sandra DeBlanc oral historySandra Louise DeBlanc was born in New Iberia, Louisiana, in 1946, and entered the United States Air Force in 1969. She trained in San Antonio and Denver as a dual-qualified officer specializing in air intelligence and photo interpretation, and was then assigned to Southeast Asia. She served with the 432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing at Udorn Royal Air Force Base, Thailand as an air intelligence officer until 1970, when she joined the 91st Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron at Bergstrom Air Force Base near Austin, Texas. She served there as a photo interpreter and disaster-preparedness office with a combat mobile squadron until 1973, when she retired from the Air Force with the rank of Captain. After her service, DeBlanc worked in business management positions for over thirty years; in her retirement, she volunteers and works in the field of legal mediation.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Ronald Litvak oral historyBorn in Cleveland, Ohio in 1938, Dr. Ronald Litvak trained as a psychiatrist (M.D., Ohio State University College of Medicine, 1964; MS in Psychiatry) before enlisting in the U.S. army in 1964. From 1968 to 1970, Dr. Litvak served as a psychiatrist at Fort Dix, New Jersey, and was ultimately promoted to the rank of major, which made him the second-in-command to Fort Dix’s chief of psychiatry. In his interview, Dr. Litvak discusses his wartime work diagnosing and treating patients, providing consulting to the training brigade and stockade, and navigating the differences in psychiatric diagnoses and treatment modalities in military service vs. civilian life. He also discusses the pressures of working as a military psychiatrist and navigating requests for medical psychiatric discharge during the Vietnam Era; and shares his own path to leaving the army, resigning his commission, and his attitude towards the war and his service in the years following his resignation.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Johnnie Downs oral historyJohnnie R. Downs was born and raised in Akron, Ohio, and was drafted into the U.S. Army in 1965. After basic training in Fort Jackson, South Carolina, Downs was assigned to the 73rd Engineers Company (Construction Support), attached to the A Company of the 84th Engineers Battalion, and he landed in Vietnam in September of 1966. Based at Qui Nhon (and later, at Phu Thai), Downs’ unit was charged with the construction of roads, bridges, heliports and other infrastructural support for the U.S. military presence in Vietnam. Downs returned to the U.S. in September of 1967 and completed his active duty in November of 1968, but he continued to serve in the Ohio Army National Guard. He found his calling working as a military instructor with the 112th Engineer Battalion and 1st Battalion, which was mobilized for federal active duty in support of Operation Noble Eagle after 9/11. After 32 years of service, Downs retired in May of 2006 with the rank of Sergeant First Class. His interview discusses the years of his service, as well as the transition back to civilian life – including the challenges of living with PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), exposure to Agent Orange, and struggles and stigmas assigned to veterans of the Vietnam War.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Jerry Corwin oral historyJerry Hayes Corwin was born in Kenton, Ohio, in 1948. His family moved to Logan County, Ohio, in 1956. He left high school in tenth grade and went to work. He received his draft notice in 1968. Hoping to avoid serving in Vietnam, he agreed to enlist and to serve three years in the U.S. Army. After basic training at Fort Gordon, Georgia, he underwent advanced training at Fort Dix, New Jersey, and at Fort Knox, Kentucky. While at Fort Dix, he received his orders and learned that he was headed to Vietnam. He was assigned to a support unit, the 9th Signal Battalion, 9th Infantry Division, which was stationed at Dong Tam, South Vietnam. An Army mechanic, Corwin repaired wheel vehicles and track vehicles. He was wounded during a rocket attack on Dong Tam. After spending four months in Vietnam, he left in August 1969 when his long-serving unit was recalled as part of President Richard Nixon's Vietnamization strategy. Corwin then was assigned to the 425th Signal Battalion stationed at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. From there he went to Fort Carson, Colorado, as part of the 4th Infantry Division. He completed his military service in September 1971. Since then he has held various jobs and owned a business with his wife, Cynthia. At age 50, Corwin entered the field of law enforcement and served as a deputy sheriff. Now retired, he and Cynthia live in West Mansfield, Ohio.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Betty "Bea" Rutter oral historyBetty Rutter (Way), known as Bea, was born in 1927 and grew up in Sewickley, Pennsylvania. Her father was a steamboat captain on the Ohio River who served on numerous Ohio River vessels, including the W. P. Snyder riverboat. She discusses her life growing up as the daughter of a riverboat captain, her marriage to another riverman and returning to the Ohio River in later life.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Joseph "Woody" Rutter oral historyJoseph "Woody" Rutter grew up on the Ohio River and has had a lifelong fascination with riverboats and river culture. He married Bea Rutter and became close with Bea's father, Fred Way a captain on various riverboats. Mr. Rutter maintained a close connection with the Ohio River, the Sons and Daughters of Pioneer Rivermen, and in particular the W. P. Snyder riverboat docked at the Ohio River Museum in Marietta.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Greater Columbus Basketball Legends Association oral historyThe Greater Columbus Basketball Legends Association (GCBLA) was started September 8, 2012 to recognize and support to former players, coaches, sports media personalities, and others who have significantly influenced the sport of basketball. Collins “Linnie” Haynesworth, Van Gregg, Dr. John Howard, Skip Young, and Reggie Lee, all members of the GCBLA, discuss the history of the sport and share some of their favorite memories of the game.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Ohio Roller Derby oral historyAmy and Kara are members of the Ohio Roller Derby and each is a derby founder in her own right. Amy is a founding member of the Ohio Roller Derby, which was started in 2005. Kara started the Emerald City Roller Derby in Eugene, Oregon in 2005 with a Craigslist post. Kara became involved with the Ohio Roller Derby when she moved to the state in 2013. Both have been surprised by the rapid growth of their league/s. In this video they share how roller derby changed and developed in the first few years of its reemergence.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Alan March oral historyAlan is a retired police lieutenant from the Cincinnati Police Department, a consultant with the Delphi Historical Society, and, most importantly for this piece, the great-grandson of Harry March. Harry March was an early football promoter and arguably one of the founders NFL and the now defunct AFL. He started his football career as the team doctor for the Canton Bulldogs before going on to work as the secretary for the New York Giants. He is credited for convincing Tim Mara to found the Giants thus establishing the NFL and the second oldest football team still in existence. In this video Alan explains how Harry went from the Canton Bulldogs to establishing the New York Giants.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Doug Brown oral historyDoug Brown is a skateboarder who grew up in Wooster, Ohio. He got his break in 2002 at the Gravity Games. Doug is a professional athlete, author, and motivational speaker. He shared a lot about his life, from his sometime difficult youth to his life as a professional skater, and beyond.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Sarah Fisher oral historySarah Marie Fisher was born October 4, 1980 in Columbus, Ohio. She is an American retired professional race car driver who competed in the Indy Racing League and the Indianapolis 500 9 times, currently more than any other woman. She also raced in NASCAR in 2004 and 2005. She started out with go cart racing and quickly moved to sprint cars and midget cars before moving to professional racing.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini oral historyRay Mancini was born in Youngstown, Ohio in 1961. They called him “Boom Boom,” the nickname of his beloved father, Lenny. He was a professional boxer from 1979 to his last fight in 1992. From May 1982 until June 1984, Mancini reigned as the World Boxing Association lightweight champion. He eventually left the fight game with a 29-5 record (23 of the wins by knockout) and good health and financial standing. In 2015, he was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2015.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Beverly Prather & Marlene Rankin oral historyBeverly Prather & Marlene Rankin daughters of Jesse Owens and organizers of the Jesse Owens Foundation. Jesse Owens was one of America's greatest participants in track and field athletic competition. He won four gold medals at the 1936 Olympic games. He was born James Cleveland Owens on September 12, 1913, in Oakville, Alabama. When he was eight years old, his family moved to Cleveland, Ohio. In his spare time after work and school, Owens excelled at track and field events and was on the track team in junior high school. He became a star athlete and tied the world record in the one hundred-yard dash while he was still in high school. He decided to attend The Ohio State University. Jesse Owens proved to be one of the greatest athletes in the history of The Ohio State University. At the Big-Ten's track and field meet on May 25, 1935, Owens tied one world record and set three new ones. Only a freshman, he did all of this with a sore back from a fall earlier in the week. Owens also accomplished these feats in a forty-five minute span. He first tied the one hundred yard dash record. He then broke the broad jump record by almost six full inches and set new records in the 220-yard dash and in the 220-yard low hurdles. In 1936, Owens competed in the Olympics in Berlin, Germany. At the Olympics, Owens won four gold medals and set or helped to set four Olympic records. The events were the one hundred-meter dash, the two hundred-meter dash, the broad jump, and the four hundred-meter relay. Owens was the first American track and field athlete to win four gold medals in a single Olympics. By the end of the competition, even German fans were celebrating Owens' accomplishments. In this video Prather and Rankin discuss their father. They discuss his accomplishment and history, but mostly on the man he was behind all of the fame.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Brian Ellis oral historyBrian Ellis is the President and COO of Nationwide Realty Investors. He was instrumental in developing and bringing to fruition Columbus's Nationwide Arena District. Here he talks about the history of the area, how the district was designed, and how it's become an economic engine generating over one billion in new investment and $68 million in annual taxes (c.2020).Oral History at Ohio Memory
Kurt BakerKurt Baker is a Honda of America Automotive Engineer and Team Manager of the Honda of America Racing Team. In this video Kurt talks about working with the team and competing at 24 Hours of Daytona with their Acura NSX endurance car.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Larry and Vince Kehres oral historyLarry and Vinces Kehres are father and son team one of which has been associated with the Mount Purple Raiders football for 37 years. Larry Kehres started at Mount Union College in 1967 playing quarterback before graduating and moving on to various coaching positions. He returned in 1986 and has been in some position in the athletic department since, he was head coach from 1987-2013. Vince began by playing for the Mount Union football from 1994-1997. He returned as a defensive coach in 2000 and took over the head coaching position from his father in 2013. Their combined record is 427-30-3, combined they have fewer losses than years they have been coaching. In 2020 Vince announced he was taking a job with the University of Toledo and Larry is retiring, it's the end of an era.Oral History at Ohio Memory
James King oral historyJames King, grandson of Ralph Hay, shares Ralph's story in this video. Ralph Hay was an owner of the Canton Bulldogs football team. A meeting that he organized in August of 1920 was where the seed of the modern NFL was germinated.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Guy Stout & Steve Guinan oral historyOn August 6, 1971, a group of women known as the Toledo Troopers began playing in the Women’s Professional Football League. Before the end of the decade, the Troopers would amass seven consecutive perfect seasons and become what many consider the winningest team in professional football history. Their coach Bill Stout wanted the Troopers to be viewed as a legitimate and serious team. From 1971 to 1977, he coached the team to a 47-1 record and seven successive championships. In 1978 and 1979, he served as the Women’s Professional Football League’s commissioner. In that same 1972 article on the Troopers, several teammates expressed their gratitude to Stout, attributing the team’s success to his dedication. The women of the Troopers were impressive and record-setting athletes. The team was selective — more than 100 women tried out for 24 spots in 1970. Linda Jefferson quickly became the team’s star running back and ran for five consecutive 1,000-yard seasons. She rushed for more than 14 yards a carry for multiple seasons and is now one of only four women inducted into the American Football Association’s Hall of Fame. Due to financial troubles, the Toledo Troopers disbanded in 1979 with a total record of 61-4, but their impact on the sport lives on. In 1983, the Troopers were recognized as the “winningest team in professional football history” at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio. The Troopers were also the first to be inducted into the Women’s Football Foundation Hall of Fame in 2014. In this video Guy Stout, Bill Stout's son, and Steve Guinan, historian and writer discuss the team.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Stephanie Hightower oral historyStephanie Hightower was born in 1958 in Louisville, Kentucky. She set records for the 110 and 60 yard hurdles while attending Stuart High School. She was a track star at The Ohio State University from 1971 to 1975. She won the Big Ten Conference Championship 15 times and went undefeated for four years of track and field competitions. She missed the 1980 Summer Olympics due to a boycott. She didn't qualify for the 1984 Olympics coming in fourth in one of the closest photo finishes ever. She later became team manager and eventually president of USA Track and Field. Currently Hightower is the President and CEO of the Columbus Urban League.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Mike & Chris Hurdzan oral historyMike Hurdzan was born September 11, 1943. He grew up playing gold and working on courses with his father and Jack Kidwell. He studied Turfgrass Management at the Ohio State University, a master's degree in Plant and Soil Science, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Plant Physiology in 1974 at the University of Vermont. Hurdzan was an Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps student. He later became a commander in the United States Army Special Forces. His unit was prepared to fight in the Vietnam War, but had their orders canceled twice. He retired from the United States Army in 1996. He runs his own, award winning, golf architecture firm with his son Chris.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Joel Masara oral historyJoel Massara is a professional gamer specializing in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. In this video he discusses how he decided to be a professional gamer, and gaming as a sport.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Jim Lorimer oral historyJim Lorimer grew up in Morrisville, Pennsylvania, a small town just north of Philadelphia. Jim was the captain of the championship football team and also the student council president. Jim graduated from high school in 1944, and drafted into the U.S. Navy. He served stateside during World War II and was eventually enrolled in a program that would have led to the U.S. Naval Academy. Jim didn’t have much of an academic record, but he did have drive and the GI Bill. Jim studied hard and graduated from Ursinus. He went on to earn a law degree from Dickinson Law. Jim became an FBI agent, and was assigned to the Detroit and Philadelphia field offices where he did surveillance work. He decided to leave the FBI for an opportunity with Nationwide Insurance in 1955. They were so good to work with he decided to pursue a permanent career in the home office in Columbus, OH. Jim became Vice President of Government Relations for Nationwide where he created one of the largest corporate-based fitness programs at the company. Jim travelled to Philadelphia in 1959 to attend the USA vs. Soviet Union men’s and women’s track and field meet. The USA lost the meet, inspiring Jim to help train the Ohio's women's track team. This led to him becoming the chairperson of the U.S. Olympic Committee for Women’s Athletics. In 1970 he organized the World Weightlifting Championships in Columbus. Jim convinced an up-and-coming Austrian to compete in the brand new Mr. World competition. Arnold came and conquered, beating Sergio Oliva, the reigning Mr. Olympia. In 1975, Arnold returned to Columbus and asked Jim to help him promote weight-lifting. This lead to the start of the Arnold Sports Classic that he's organized for the past 45 years. Jim still comes into the office every day to work on the Classic.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Elaine Boltz & Beth Conway oral historyBoltz and Conway are both former OSU basketball players who went on to coach girls' high school basketball. In this video they discuss their basketball history, coaching a team, and Title XI's effects on the opportunities in women's sports.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Ken Davis oral historyKen "Bear" Davis was a former player and coach of Major League Lacrosse of the Ohio Machine. Davis started at the Wheeling Jesuit men’s lacrosse program and guided the Cardinals to a Number 10 national ranking in 2003. After this Davis built the men’s lacrosse program at Robert Morris University over the span of eight seasons. In 2011 Davis led RMU lacrosse to its first ever 20 ranking. Robert Morris led the NCAA in scoring for two straight seasons under Davis. From there he took over boy’s lacrosse at Archbishop Spalding High School, Maryland. In 2013 Davis took the head coaching position for the Ohio Machine and by 2017 led the Ohio Machine to the playoffs for the 4th straight appearance and a Major League Lacrosse championship.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Stephen Pleasnick oral historyStephen G. Pleasnick was the former Superintendent of the Franklin County Board of Developmental Disabilities from 1973-1999 and Board member for the Ohio Special Olympics. In 1964 he was one of the founding members of the Ohio Athletic Association for the Mentally Retarded. He joined Jimmy Crum, Sonny DeLong and Dr. Walt Ersing starting the Association." In 1973 the group was accredited to run Special Olympics in Ohio. Steve volunteered for 54 years and has seen the programs evolve from a track and field meet to a multi-sport, year round and inclusive athletic and recreational program. Pleasnick attends the Ohio Special Olympics Games annually, and attended the first National Special Olympics held in Chicago in 1968.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Edward Ogden oral historyEdward "Eddie" Ogden is the Airship Historian and Public Relations Manager for Goodyear Airship Operations. In this video he talks about the history of Goodyear airships and his own experience working with the Goodyear "blimps."Oral History at Ohio Memory
James "Buster" Douglas oral historyJames "Buster" Douglas was born April 7, 1960 in Columbus, Ohio. Douglas is an American former professional boxer who competed between 1981 and 1999. He is the son of professional boxer William "Dynamite" Douglas and best known for his upset victory over Mike Tyson in 1990, in Tokyo. Winning the undisputed heavyweight title. Douglas reigned as the world heavyweight champion for eight months and two weeks, losing on October 25, 1990, to Evander Holyfield via third-round knockout, in his only title defense. After a break from the sport he returned for several fights in 1997, retiring from the sport a year later in 1998. He now coaches boxing at the Thompson Community Center in Columbus. He's also worked in media and promotions in the boxing industry.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Stanley & Malcolm Ross oral historyStan and his son Malcolm Ross are racing enthusiasts. They have a collection of race cars that includes Porsches, Ferraris, Indy racing, and others. They drive their cars on the track but neither are professional racers. When Malcolm was young he had a bad accident while running laps at a race track. He suffered severe brain trauma. His parents have been big supports of brain research by funding the Stanley D. and Joan H. Ross Center for Brain Health and Performance at OSU.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Fred McLeod & Austin Carr oral historyAustin Carr was born in 1948 in Washington D.C. He is a former professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association who played for the Cleveland Cavaliers, Dallas Mavericks, and Washington Bullets. He played in college for the University of Notre Dame. He is Director of Community Relations for the Cavaliers and is also a color commentator known in Cleveland as "Mr. Cavalier". Fred McLeod III was born in 1952 in Strongsville, OH. He was an American sportscaster who served as the executive producer of multimedia, and television play-by-play announcer for the Cleveland Cavaliers. He also worked as a sportscaster in St. Joseph, Missouri, and Steubenville, Ohio before working in as the play by play announcer for the Cleveland Indians and the Detroit Pistons. He passed away in September of 2019. In this interview they talk about working together as announcing Cleveland Cavalier games.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Fred McLeod oral historyFred McLeod III was born in 1952 in Strongsville, OH. He was an American sportscaster who served as the executive producer of multimedia, and television play-by-play announcer for the Cleveland Cavaliers. He also worked as a sportscaster in St. Joseph, Missouri, and Steubenville, Ohio before working in as the play by play announcer for the Cleveland Indians and the Detroit Pistons. He passed away in September of 2019.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Michael "Campy" Russell oral historyMichael "Campy" Russell was born in 1952 in Jackson, Tennessee. He is a former professional basketball player. He played in college for the University of Michigan. He played in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Cleveland Cavaliers from 1974 to 1980 and New York Knicks from 1980 to 1982. Today Campy is the Director of Alumni Relations for the Cavaliers.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Austin Carr oral historyAustin Carr was born in 1948 in Washington D.C. He is a former professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association who played for the Cleveland Cavaliers, Dallas Mavericks, and Washington Bullets. He played in college for the University of Notre Dame. He is Director of Community Relations for the Cavaliers and is also a color commentator known in Cleveland as "Mr. Cavalier".Oral History at Ohio Memory
Larry Nance Sr. oral historyLarry Nance Sr. was born in 1959 in Anderson, South Carolina. He is an American former professional basketball player. Larry was a forward at Clemson University before playing 13 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA.) He was a member of the Phoenix Suns from 1981 to 1988 and the Cleveland Cavaliers from 1988 t0 1994. Larry's son, Larry Nance Jr., is currently playing for the Cavaliers wearing his father's number 22.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Bob Castellini oral historyBob Castellini was born in 1941, in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the President of the Castellini Group of Companies. The Castellini family has long been in the fresh produce business and now are one of the largest distributors of fresh produce in the United States. Bob was part of the St. Louis Cardinals' ownership group until 1995 when he sold his shares. In 2006, he was the leader of a group who purchased the Cincinnati Reds baseball team.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Hiram College Basketball oral historyThe 1904 Hiram College Basketball Team won the sport’s first gold medal in that year’s Olympic Games. Basketball was first played as a demonstration sport in the 1904 Olympic Games in St. Louis, Missouri, which were held in conjunction with the St. Louis World’s Fair of 1904. Originally planned for Chicago, the Olympics were moved to St. Louis to avoid competition for visitors. The Hiram College team won the opportunity to compete in the games by first winning the Ohio Basketball Championship. Unlike in modern basketball, Hiram, Wheaton College, and Latter-Day Saints University squared off on an outdoor court, where Wheaton players had to wear cleats for traction on the slippery field! Hiram defeated Wheaton College 25 to 20, and L.D.S.U. 25 to 18. Jerrod K. Plate, Director of Sports Information for Hiram College, shares the story of Hiram College become colligate champions at the 1904 Olympic Games.Oral History at Ohio Memory
John Michael oral historyJohn Michael was born in 1972 in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania. He is an American sports broadcaster, currently serving as the TV play by play announcer for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the NBA. Previously he served as the team's radio play by play announcer. He practiced law for several years right out of college before making a career switch to sports announcing. He got his start as the play-by-play announcer for the Hagerstown Suns hockey team.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Nick and James Robinson oral historyNick and James Robinson both Engineers for Honda of America and both are Honda’s Pikes Peak team members. In this video they talk about their experiences with the Pikes Peak Hill Climb. The Pikes Peak International Hill Climb is an annual automobile and motorcycle hillclimb to the summit of Pikes Peak in Colorado, USA.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Joe Napoli oral historyPresident & CEO, Toledo Mud Hens Baseball Club, Toledo Walleye Hockey Club and Hensville. Born in Brooklyn, New York, Joe graduated from St. John’s University in New York City. After graduation, he joined Manufacturer’s Hanover Trust in New York City. Joe’s twenty-five year career in sports began in Canton Ohio, with the Canton Indians. In the early 90’s, he moved to Toledo to work for the Toledo Mud Hens before spending several years working for the Chicago Bulls and Detroit Tigers. Joe returned to Toledo to embark on the development of Fifth Third Field in downtown Toledo. In 2012, the Hens initiated efforts to begin the downtown Toledo re-development, with Tom Chema, of three historic buildings and park space which will become known as “Hensville.” According to Nielsen Scarborough Research, the Hens and Walleye continue to rank amongst the most popular franchises in Major and Minor League sports. Sports Business Journal selected Toledo as the #1, now #2, Market in America for Minor League sports. Both the Hens and Walleye have been recognized and awarded for organizational excellence by Minor League Baseball and Minor League Hockey.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Charles "Chuck" Csuri oral historyCharles "Chuck" Csuri was born July 4, 1922 is a pioneer in the field of digital art and considered the father of modern digital art and computer animation. Csuri attended college at The Ohio State University where he played on the football team becoming captain of the Ohio State University's first national championship football team in 1942. He served in Army during World War II receiving the Bronze Star for heroism in 1945. After World War II, Csuri returned to OSU where he completed his masters in Art Education and joined the faculty of the Art Department. Csuri created his first computer art in 1964. At OSU Csuri founded multiple groups dedicated to the development of digital art and computer animation. He and Robert Kanuth founded Cranston/Csuri Productions, an early computer animation production companies. In this video Csuri talks about his football days, World War II, and digital art.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Ramona Isbell & Chris Bournea oral historyRamona is a former professional wrestler who competed in the 1960s and 70s. Chris Bournea is the director of "Lady Wrestlers: The Amazing, Untold Story of African-American Women in the Ring" featuring Ramona among other wrestlers such as Babs Wingo, and Ethel Johnson. In this video Ramona recalls her time in the ring and Chris explains why he felt it was important to tell their story.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Tom Chema oral historyTom Chema began his career with the Cleveland-based law firm of Arter & Hadden. He has served as Executive Director of the Ohio Lottery Commission; Chairman of the Ohio Public Utilities Commission; and as Executive Director of the Gateway Economic Development Corporation. He has also served the past 11 years as President of Hiram College, in Hiram, Ohio. He is currently the President of Gateway Consultants Group, Inc., providing consultation services across the country on sports and entertainment-related economic development projects. Tom is recognized as an expert on energy and telecommunications economics and regulation, infrastructure planning, and developing public/private partnerships. In this interview he talks about public/private partnerships, primarily his role in managing the project building the Cavaliers Arena in Cleveland and Fifth Third Field in Toledo. He also discusses growing up in Ohio, his military career, heading the lottery commission and the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio. Tom resides in Westlake, Ohio.Oral History at Ohio Memory
St.Vincent–St.Mary Fab Five oral historyLeBron James, Dru Joyce III, Romeo Travis, Sian Cotton, Willie McGee, the "Fab Five," played high school basketball for St. Vincent–St. Mary High School from 1999 to 2003. In this time the group lead by LeBron James won 3 Division II championships. In this video Willie McGee and Dru Joyce II, coach, discuss the groups accent to basketball champions and some of their struggles along the way.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Kathy Wyatt oral historyKathy Wyatt is the former spouse of Kirby Wyatt. She shares her memories of Kirby and his time as the drum major for TBDBITL at The Ohio State University.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Paul Dolan oral historyPaul Dolan was born in 1958 in Chardon, Ohio. Paul is an attorney and Major League Baseball team executive who is currently a partial owner, chairman, and CEO of the Cleveland Indians. He graduated law school from St. Lawrence University and went to work for his father's law firm Thrasher, Dinsmore, and Dolan. Larry Dolan purchase the Indians in 2000 and Paul became the Vice President eventually becoming the Chairman/CEO and control-person in 2013.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Jim Tressel oral historyJames (Jim) Tressel was born on December 5, 1952, in Mentor, Ohio. He was the son of legendary college coach Lee Tressel and played for his father at Baldwin-Wallace College. He graduated from Baldwin-Wallace in 1975 with a degree in education. In 1975, Tressel had his first on-field coaching experience, serving as a graduate assistant at the University of Akron. From 1976 to 1978, Tressel coached the quarterbacks, the running backs, and wide receivers. Following his stint at Akron, Tressel was an assistant coach at Miami University, in Oxford, Ohio, and at Syracuse University. In 1983, he came to The Ohio State University, where he eventually would coach the quarterbacks, the running backs, and wide receivers. In 1985, Tressel left Ohio State to accept the head coaching position at Youngstown State University. Tressel struggled his first season at Youngstown State, winning only two games, but he quickly built a national powerhouse in Division I-AA football. During the 1990s, Youngstown State won 103 games, lost twenty-seven, and tied two. Tressel teams also won four national championships. Tressel's father had also won a national championship while at Baldwin-Wallace. The Tressels are the only father and son combination to coach college teams to national championships. In 2001, Tressel became the head coach of The Ohio State Buckeyes. His teams excelled on the field, winning the national championship in only Tressel's second season with the team. In his 10 years with the Buckeyes they won the Big Ten Conference seven times and gone to the national championship 3 times. Tressel's overall winning percentage with the Buckeyes is nearly 83%, the second highest of any Ohio State University coach up to that time. In 2011 Tressel resigned from the over fallout from memorabilia-for-tattoos scandal. Tressel became the Vice President of Strategic Engagement for the University of Akron in 2012, staying for only two years. Since 2014 he has held the position of President at Youngstown State University. Under his guidance the University has increased enrollment and hit record fundraising levels.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Katie Smith oral historyKatie Smith from Logan, Ohio was named Gatorade National Player of the Year in High School. At OSU she broke scoring records and was twice named Big Ten Conference player of the year. She started her professional career with the Columbus Quest, which was part of the ABL. When the ABL folded she played for the Minnesota Lynx of the WNBA. She has also played for the Detroit Shock, Washington Mystics, Seattle Storm, and the New York Liberty. She is the only player to have championship rings from both the ABL and WNBA. Katie represented the United States at the Olympics in 1993 and 1998 helping the USAB secure gold medals both times.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Mike Brown oral historyMike Brown, longtime owner of the Bengals and son of legendary football coach, Paul Brown. Brown graduated from Dartmouth College in 1957, where he played quarterback for their football team, and from Harvard Law School in 1959. Brown followed his father into football management. Paul Brown founded the Bengals in 1968, as he put it so that he could give football back to his father (Paul had been fired several years before after a falling out with Art Modell). He began his executive duties with the Bengals as assistant general manager. eventually becoming the owner and Chief Executive of the team. Now in his early 80s, Mike talked with us sharing story after story about growing up with football, his commitment to the team, his love for Cincinnati and devotion to the game. Mike was in no way the rough and gruff man that the media sometimes portrays him to be. He was soft spoken and thoughtful and had his own opinions. It was clear that football runs deep in his blood and that he is proud of his family, team and city.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Christina Goddard-Graves oral historyChristina Goddard-Graves was born in 1977 in Louisville, Kentucky. Her dad was career Army which inspired her to join the military. Christina enlisted in the Air Force in 1999 and went to California for her basic training. After only two months she was deployed to Prince Sultan Air Base in Saudi Arabia where she worked with the Security Forces. In her interview she speaks extensively on the difficulties of being gay in the military prior to the repeal of "Don't ask, don't tell." She discusses coming to terms with her sexuality in the military and the worries that it created. She even describes a circumstance where she was being investigated by another service member. The fear of being discovered and dishonorably discharged lead her to leave the Air Force prior to completing two years.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Urulee Watson oral historyUrulee Watson was born in 1945 in Sherrill, Arkansas. His grandparents were sharecroppers and some of his earliest memories is from their farm. In 1950 his parents moved north to Cincinnati looking for employment opportunities. Watson did well in school and entered the University of Cincinnati, but grew tired of the classes. In 1968 he deferred a year and enlisted in the Marine Corps. He went to basic training at Camp Pendleton after which he attend Officer Training at Quantico. He choose to be an Infantry Officer and was sent to Vietnam. In Vietnam he was stationed at Vandegrift Combat Base outside of Ca Lu in the Quang Tri Province. He talks about the kind of patrols they went on, the political climate in Vietnam, working with the Republic of Korea Marines, and racism. After his time in Vietnam he was sent to Okinawa where he worked with the military police. Before he returned to the states he had a decision to make. What did he want to do next? He transferred to the Military Police for a time working as an MP at Camp Pendleton. Watson shares a wonderful story about Richard Nixon bodysurfing at Pendleton. After this he leaves the Marines and work in international shipping in private sector.Oral History at Ohio Memory
John Beck oral historyThe following is a summary of my Military Service in the U.S. Army from January 1957 to December 1959 during the “Cold War”. I enlisted on January 3, 1957 as a private E1 in the U.S. Army. I changed the enlistment from Airborne to Electronic Technology. Basic Training was in Fort Knox Kentucky during the winter months, January through March. I earned the Expert Marksmanship Medal with the third highest score in our battalion with only three missed bullseyes with my MI rifle. My next training school was an 11-week radio repair course at The Signal School at Fort Monmouth in New Jersey. As a top tech student, I was offered my choice of subsequent advanced studies at Fort Mead in Maryland or Redstone Arsenal in Alabama. My choice was Redstone. At Redstone Arsenal, I began my twenty weeks of studies in the Ordnance Guided Missile School. The classes were morning or evening. We had all been screened for security clearances. We had individual combination locked safes that contained schematics and classroom lessons. We had to sign in and out whenever we opened the safes. We wore badges denoting our clearances and areas of access to classrooms or study areas. Life on the base was relaxed and there was no sense of military pressure. There was recreation on base and we went into Huntsville for a meal and a movie. Many of us spent weekends at Guntersville Lake. The brigadier general in charge of the post also grazed his prize Black Angus cattle on government land. We knew of U.S. activities that were directed toward putting up the first American satellite. We did not notice any on-post activity or sounds that would indicate there was any urgency in placing the first U.S. Satellite into orbit. The world of the cold war took on new meaning on October 4, 1957 when the Russians launched Sputnik. The next day, October 5, the Redstone Arsenal became a bustle of activity. We could hear the roar of Saturn engines being tested from the early morning hours to dusk. Inspections became a weekly activity. We saw more staff cars and uniformed officers from other allied nations. The Space Race had begun. My Redstone studies concluded on November 15, 1957. I was now a PFC (E-3) and given my choice of duty assignments; I selected Germany. My first duty station was at the U.S. Airbase in Wiesbaden where we serviced Nike missile sites. I then received new orders transferring me to Karlsruhe to be a part of a new unit, the Seventh Army Guided Missile Surveillance Detachment. I soon received a promotion to SP4 (E4). The “Surveillance Detachment” was assigned to Battalion Headquarters. The Detachment was made up of highly trained technicians who had specialized in training in almost all area to missile delivery systems and the related transportation equipment. In December 1958, I received orders to travel to army headquarter in Munich to travel to Bad Tolz and Lenggries in Bavaria. The assignment was not clear, but I arrived in one of the most beautiful places in the whole world. The old German Military post was near Garmisch nestled in the Austrian Alps. Ten-or-twelve of us found ourselves attending class with unnamed instructors. There was only one U.S. Army Captain without a name tag who introduced us to our course of study. Following that introduction, all of our instructors were in plain clothes, i.e. white shirts and ties. We were being introduced to radiation and its spread in nuclear material, either our or the Russians, and how to detect types and levels of strength. We were issued dosimeters badges both were collected at the end of each day. Large lead line containers nearly a foot thick were opened and closed as we took our measurements at various angles and distances. As we worked with radioactive materials, the instructors left the building. On March 9, 1959, I received my “Rocker”; I was not an SP5 (E5), AKA, a sergeant. I was also assigned to Troop Information School. I then taught a number of different topics or courses, including a Saturday morning class. I was in charge of the men and equipment in the garage complexes that included repair trucks and test equipment that needed to be loaded on trucks or marked for destruction. In December, I received my orders to return home for early discharge. While working forty hours a week, I enrolled in The Ohio State University in January 1960 with a full load of classes ranging from twelve-to-twenty class hours. I majored in physics with a minor in mathematics. I received my Bachelor’s Degree in March 1964. After teaching physics for three years, I began my career publishing technical textbooks and worked for several publishers in New York City. I returned to the classrooms at Fairleigh Dickinson University and later to Capital University where I earned my MBA with honors With Distinction. My wife, Jayne, and I reside in Worthington Hills.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Charles Tweel oral historyCharles Tweel grew up in Huntington, West Virginia and attended The Ohio State University. After graduation in 1968, he enlisted in the U.S. Army as a non-combatant, first training as a medic at Fort Sam Houston, followed by nine months of additional training at Valley Forge General Hospital in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. He finished his training as a Specialist 3 and 91C, MOS, and went on to serve in Bamberg, Germany, with combat engineers for one year. In January 1971, Tweel served in Vietnam with the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion (Air Mobile), 506th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, based out of Camp Evans near Phu Bai, north of Hue, until December of that year. Tweel spent most of his service on various firebases as the medic in charge, and occasionally shared firebases with South Vietnamese soldiers. He also visited MedCAP stations (Medical Civic Action Programs) where he treated civilians. Tweel received the Bronze Star Medal for meritorious achievement, and was promoted to Specialist 5 in 1971. After discharge from the Army, he went to medical school and was in private practice as a family practitioner from 1979-2016, and now works part-time in inner city medical clinics in Columbus, Ohio, and Charleston, South Carolina.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Rupert "Twink" Starr oral historyRupert “Twink” Starr was born in Mt. Sterling, Ohio in 1923. His father was a dentist and his mother was a teacher. Twink Attended Ohio University to study where he joined the ROTC (Reserve Officers’ Training Corps). In January of 1945, Twink decided to enlisted into active duty with the Army. He completed Infantry School at Ft. Benning and was assigned to 101st Infantry Division as a 2nd Lt. He was stationed outside of London. Twink was sent from there to Belgium to help bolster the 106th Infantry where he served as the liaison officer at company headquarters. This was far from a safe job since he was responsible for maintaining communications with the frontline. This job would often require him to travel trough areas patrolled by German soldiers. On one outing he stepped into a foxhole while trying to avoid a patrol and ended up sitting across from a German soldier who he described as, "being as scared as I was." When the 106th was surrounded by enemy forces he was sent out with a message requesting backup from 422nd. He dodged bullets and eventually joined up with the 7th Armored, but was captured a short time later before reaching his goal. He was awarded the Bronze Star and Combat Infantry Badge for these actions. The Germans packed him and other soldiers onto a train car where he spent the next 8 days in cramped, filthy conditions with almost no food or water. He ended up at Oflag 64/Z a POW camp near Szubin, Poland. When the Russians began closing in on their position the guards began marching them back towards Germany. Outfitted with only a field jacket and woolen mittens for warmth Twink had a long, cold march. Their guards eventually abandoned them and they were rescued by the Russian Army, In Wugarten now Ogardy, Poland. They were transferred to the English Army before finally being returned to the American Army and sent home. After he got home Twink finished his degree and got into real estate where he worked under a fellow Mount Sterling native, John Galbreath. In the 1950s a psychiatrist gave him some very good advice. He told Twink to accept who he was and go out and enjoy his life, and he did just that. Twink met interior designer Thomas Allan Wingfield and they spent over 50 years together before Allan passed in 2007. Though it wasn't until the early 90s that Twink began coming out to those outside of the LGBT community. Since then he has tried to live as an inspiration to the younger generation. In 2009 he was honored as the Grande Marshall of Stonewall Columbus's Pride Parade. He was also part of the documentary “Courage Under Fire” that advocated for the end of the military's Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Sam Covelli oral historySam Covelli is the President and CEO of Covelli Enterprises, the 4th largest restaurant franchisee in the country as of 2014. Covelli Enterprises employs more than 35,000 people at Panera Bread, Dairy Queen, and O'Charley restaurants across the US and Canada. Sam is one of two children born to Albert and Suzanne Covelli. In this interview he talks about his father and the early days when they worked McDonalds restaurants. He discusses the shift to Paneras and developing Covelli Enterprises into an international company. He also shares about being an Ohio State super-fan, and supporting the college and his local community.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Charles Tweel & John Georgiton photo reviewCharles Tweel grew up in Columbus, Ohio, and attended The Ohio State University. After graduation in 1968, he enlisted in the U.S. Army as a non-combatant, first training as a medic at Fort Sam Huston, followed by nine months of additional training at Valley Forge General Hospital in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. He finished his training as a Specialist 3 and 91C, MOS, and went on to serve in Bamberg, Germany, with combat engineers for one year. In January 1971, Tweel served in Vietnam with the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion (Air Mobile), 506th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, based out of Camp Evans near Phu Bai, north of Hue, until December of that year. Tweel spent most of his service on various firebases as the medic in charge, and occasionally shared firebases with South Vietnamese soldiers. He also visited MedCAP stations (Medical Civic Action Programs) where he treated civilians. Tweel received the Bronze Star Medal for meritorious achievement, and was promoted to Specialist 5 in 1971. After discharge from the Army, he went to medical school and was in private practice as a family practitioner from 1979-2016, and now works part-time in inner city medical clinics in Columbus, Ohio, and Charleston, South Carolina. John Georgiton was born in 1947 in Columbus, Ohio. He attended The Ohio State University and was in the Reserve Officer Training Corp. In April 1970 he was sent to Vietnam as a member of the 101st Airborne. Camp Evans was where Georgiton was stationed but he spent most of his time fighting in the mountains west of Huế City. By the end of July he was the only platoon leader left in his battalion that hadn't been killed or wounded. He was sent home in 1971 his participation in the conflict over. He remains a vocal advocate for the rights of veterans. Tweel and Georgiton review photos taken by Tweel in Vietnam and comment or share their memories of each.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Robert Peeples oral historyRobert Lee "Bob" Peeples, Sr., age 82, was born October 9, 1928 in Thomson, GA. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps, and retired from the U.S. Air Force in 1967 after 23 years of service. He started out as a heavy equipment operator before moving on to aircraft maintenance. He became a member of the Tuskegee Airmen at Lockbourne AFB where he served from 1947-1949. He served with the Air Force in Italy, Germany, France, England, North Africa, Japan, Okinawa, Korea, and Vietnam. Peeples received the Congressional Gold Medal and numerous military awards and decorations. He was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, and the Disabled American Veterans. His Tuskegee Airmen Inc. chapter were responsible for the Ohio Memorial Presidents' Plaque, 1998-2003; State of Ohio Tuskegee Airmen Marker, 2003; and The Tuskegee Airmen Memorial, 2000. In this interview he discusses his childhood in Georgia, why he joined the AAC, and his travels abroad. He talks about his experiences with racism and the segregated military, how the military influenced his life, and what he did after.Oral History at Ohio Memory
John Marty oral historyJohn L Marty was born 1923 in Cleveland, Ohio to John and Stella Marty. His mother worked as a drafter and photostat engineer at a steel mill. was a veteran of WWII who served in the European theater with the 202nd Engineers Combat Battalion. He graduated from Purdue University in 1951 and retired after 35 years as an aeronautical engineer with Rockwell International. He wanted to get into the Air Force, so he decided to enlist to better his chances but ended up in the Army while his draft group ended up in the Air Force. Marty discusses his childhood during the great depression, how he ended up in an engineering group, and his voyage across the Atlantic on rough seas. He describes his job building bridges, the bombings, and traveling through the rubble left behind. Marty spent time working in Brest, France where the Germans had submarine pens. He shares many recollections from his service time, and his take-always from the war.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Walter Baum oral historyWalter Baum attended Cornell University for pre-med and New York University School of Medicine for his M.D. which he received in 1943. In WWII he was a Battalion Surgeon in the 556 AAA assigned to the European Theater of Operations. After discharge he remained in the Army Reserve where he served as Commander of the 449 General Hospital and 307 Medical Group Army Reserves, retiring as a full Colonel after 26 years. Outside of the Reserves he practiced Internal Medicine from 1951-1978 later he became Medical Director for Equitable Life Assurance and consultant for American Physicians Life. In his oral history he discusses growing up during the Great Depression, his military service, and coming back home.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Betty Samllsreed oral historyBetty Smallsreed (Warman) was born in 1923 in Columbus, Ohio. She lived in the Hilltop neighborhood. Her father was a teacher at Central High School, while she attended North High School. In 1943, after both of her brothers enter the service, she joined the United States Naval Reserve (Women's Reserve), known as the WAVES. She was stationed in D.C. in an office that was working on breaking Japanese codes. After the war she attended Capital University and worked, for a while, in Radio and TV. In her interview she talks about growing up in the Great Depression, joining the WAVES, women in the Navy, and attending University on the G.I. Bill.Oral History at Ohio Memory
John Rowland oral historyJohn Rowland was born in 1923 in Hamilton, OH. He was the first person drafted to the Army from Westerville, Ohio. He was inducted at Fort Hayes and sent to Fort Knox for armored training. There he was assigned to the 192nd Tank Battalion. John was sent to Clark Air Base in November of 1941. He was stationed in various places but ultimately was part of the Bataan Death March following the Allied surrender in April of 1942. He was held at Hoten POW Camp in Mukden, Manchuria (Shenyang, China) until the camp was liberated by the Russians in August of 1945. He returned home and was married. In his oral history he talks about: growing up during the depression, being drafted in the army, the Bataan Death March, being a POW, and life after WWII.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Dora Rosenfeld oral historyDora Esther Rosenfeld was born in May of 1922. She attended The Ohio State University and graduated with a degree in Art. She worked for the Columbus Department of Parks and Recreation, eventually rising to become the director of the Cultural Arts Center in 1962 until she retired in 1992. In this interview she talks about growing up in the depression, her time at OSU, working at the Erie Proving Grounds, her brothers experiences (Zal and Mayer) in the war, and the country post WWII.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Mary K. Powers oral historyMary K. Powers was born in April of 1921 to Wallace and Mary Powers. She attended North High School and OSU where she graduated with a degree in Education. Mary and her husband Robert were married in 1943 before he was deployed to the European theater of WWII where he served as an infantry captain. She gave birth to their first child before Robert returned. In her interview she talks about being a single parent during the war. She also discusses life during the depression, the impacts of WWII, and really stresses how no one felt put-upon because everyone was sharing the same burdens.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Esther Leggett oral historyEsther Leggett born in 1924 in Chillicothe, Ohio was a long time volunteer at the Ohio History Connection (1972-2016). This video is an interview she did for the exhibit "Kilroy Was Here," it focus on her life and memories from the 1940s. In this interview she talks about Columbus in the 1950s, living in Levittown, women in the workforce, socializing, driving, children, food, media, and historic events.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Dr. Arthur E. Thomas oral historyDr. Arthur E. Thomas, President Emeritus of Central State University (CSU), a Historically Black College University (HBCU), located at Wilberforce OH, originally came from Philadelphia PA, received his Bachelor's degree from CSU, earned a Masters degree at Miami University, Oxford OH; and an E.D.. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is the recipient of honorary degrees from Central State University, Capital University at Columbus OH, and Shaw College (formerly) at Detroit MI. After ultimately becoming the first alumnus to be appointed president, vice president and honored as president emeritus of his Alma Mater; he became Chairman of the Board for NAFEO (National Association in Equal Opportunity in Higher Education), the professional organization of all public and private HBCU presidents. Part I Dr. Thomas, born in Philadelphia in 1938, discusses growing up and his schooling. He describes his motivations for succeeding, his family, and his time in the Army. After graduating college in 1962 he starts teaching in the Dayton public schools while working on his masters at Miami University. He talks about his work with the Center for the Study of Student Citizenship, Rights, and Responsibilities and the Model Cities program in Dayton, Ohio. He speaks about working at Wright State where he held multiple positions and started the "Like It Is" television program. He talks about some of his work at Central State University. Part II Dr. Thomas talks about his life and career of teaching in the Dayton OH School District, civil rights activism; record setting accomplishments at CSU, legal battles won against the State of Ohio; connections to Harvard University; work at FAMU and NAFEO with Dr. Frederick S. Humphries, a past president of NAFEO, their success with the Kellogg Foundation funded Leadership Fellows Program and fights for equal justice in higher education; describes achievements with Ph. D. programs at California State University/San Bernadino and Morgan State University; and speaks about his continuing work with HBCUs, NAFEO, other organizations; advocating for his people, his legacy and future.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Charmaine McGuffey oral historyCharmaine McGuffey was born and raised in Cincinnati. She and her two sisters grew up with a single mother who worked long hours to support her family. She attended Western Hills High School where she realized she wanted to be a police officer. She graduated from the Criminal Justice program at the University of Cincinnati and joined the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office in 1983. She started out as a jail service deputy but quickly rose through the ranks. McGuffey became Captain of the Training Academy eventually becoming a Major in charge of Jail and Court Services. Additionally she served as the lead hostage negotiator for the Special Response Team, was Captain of the Honor Guard, and was the Academy Commander for the Ohio Peace Officer Corrections Academy. During this time She was Law Enforcement Officer of the Year and was named the 2016 Public Citizen of the Year by the Ohio Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers. In 2017 she was fired from her position which she attributes to being an outspoken advocate for inmates, but also because of her gender and sexual orientation. In 2020 she ran for and was elected as the Hamilton County Sheriff, running against the man who had fired her. In her interview she talks about her childhood in Cincinnati, how she became interested in becoming a police officer, and her first years in the sheriff's office. She describes her focus on getting and keeping people out of jail through recovery, training, and getting services into the jail through pod programs. She shares the difficulties of being a woman and a lesbian in the law enforcement field. McGuffey discusses why and how she was fired, and how she made the decision to run for Sheriff. She finishes by talking about some of the recent issues that she's going to have to deal with coming back into the job, such as COVID-19.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Michael Schoedinger oral historyMichael Schoedinger is the current president and sixth-generation owner of Schoedinger Funeral and Cremation Service in Columbus, Ohio. The Schoedingers have been in funeral business since 1855 and over the years have been the first to introduce many innovations to the field. Michael talks about growing up in the funeral industry, how he decided to becoming involved with the family business, and what the business means to him. He discusses talks about changes to the business over time, the future of the family business, and the importance of grieving. Michael also came in to talk about how the coronavirus pandemic has effected business and the changes they have made to adapt to these difficult times.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Mutual Burton oral historyReverend Mutual Burton was born in Mitchel County Georgia in 1903. His parents moved to Columbus in 1917. They settled in the King-Lincoln Area where he attended Columbus Evening High School. He went on to pastor at Mount Zion Baptist Church. In his interview he talks primarily about Columbus in the 1910s through the 1940s. He focuses primarily on Black life in Columbus including topics like: segregation, theaters, community leaders, schools, churches, newspapers, crime, and the difference between the Black community in the south and the north.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Lydia O. Burkes oral historyLydia Burkes was born in Greenwood County South Carolina in 1904. She moves with her parent to the King-Lincoln area of Columbus, Ohio in 1908. She got her bachelors and masters in education and worked in the Columbus Education Department, the Columbus Recreation and Parks Department, and Felton Elementary School. In this interview she talks about working in the church and inter-church relations, Black leaders, race relations, segregation, and teaching.Oral History at Ohio Memory
James "Eddie" Saunders oral historyJames Edward “Eddie” Saunders was born in Covington, Kentucky in 1909. He came to Columbus, Ohio in 1937 where he worked at the Deshler-Wallick Hotel before going to the Timken Roller Bearing Company and Pullman Company. He used earnings to start the "Swanee Hour" on WHKC in 1944 until 1948 where he got a job on WVKO becoming the first Black Disc Jockey in Columbus. He produced the longest running religious program "Sermons and Songs" and "Eddie Saunders Presents." Saunders was honored for supporting the Black community through his work and philanthropic endeavors in 1962 with the “Outstanding negroes in the U.S.” award from the National Urban League. In this interview he talks about his career in radio, discrimination in Columbus, civil rights demonstrations, politics, and Black community leaders.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Rev. Dr. Phale D. Hale, Sr. oral historyRev. Dr. Phale D. Hale, Sr. was born in 1915 in Starksville, Mississippi to Churchill and Elizabeth Lou Ellen Hale. He hitchhiked north after graduating high school and found work with the WPA in Buffalo, New York. He used his earning to attend Morehouse College. He pastored in LaGrange, Georgia while receiving his masters from Gammon Theological Seminary. He lead a church in Fort Wayne, Indiana before becoming the pastor of Union Grove Baptist Church in Columbus, Ohio. As leader of his church he started many social outreach programs including day cares and a credit union, He was involved in civil rights and was responsible for opening banks to African American employees. He was president of the Ohio NAACP and was elected to the Ohio House in 1966. Hale was a founding member of the Ohio Legislative Black Caucus. He served as the leader of many religious and political organizations as well as the head of his church until he retired in 1990s.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Dick Schafrath oral historyDick Schafrath was born in Wooster, Ohio in 1937. He's lived a remarkable and storied life. He played for the Ohio State University football team before being drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the NFL where he earned the nickname the Mule. Schafrath has coached for the Browns and the Toledo Rockets and was an Ohio Senator from 1987 through 2000. This interview was conducted for the Ohio History Connection's 1950s exhibit and focuses on his life in the 1950s and 60s. In this interview he talks about growing up on his parents farm, playing football with OSU, and the Cleveland Browns. He lived with famous coach Woody Hayes for a year and a half and shares his memories of Woody. Schafrath discusses Brown's coach Paul Brown, serving in the Air Force while playing in the NFL, and his experience of the 1950s. He also shares great stories about wrestling a bear, hanging out with Elvis, and finding out about being drafted by the Browns while traveling with Dick LeBeau.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Jackie Mayer oral historyJacquelyn "Jackie" Mayer was born in 1942 and grew up in Sandusky, Ohio. Her mother was a music teacher and singer and with her support Jackie became Miss Ohio in 1962 and was crowned Miss America in 1963. At the age of 28 she suffered a near fatal stroke and worked as a health care activist and motivational speaker. This interview was conducted for the 1950s exhibit at the Ohio History Connection. In her interview she focuses on her life and experiences in the 1950s and 60s. Mayer discusses growing up in Sandusky, her experience as an exchange student, and focus on body image. She shares her memories of TV and radio, and how her desire to sing with Fred Waring & His Pennsylvanians translated into becoming Miss America. She talks about such subjects as dating, driving culture, family life, civil rights, and health in the 1950s. Mayer also describes religion and her awareness of growing up in an dual-faith household, her father was Jewish and her mother Presbyterian.Oral History at Ohio Memory
James "Jim" L. Giles oral historyJames "Jim" Giles was born Chillicothe, Ohio in 1939. He grew up with his mother's family in Chillicothe, and his father in New York City. After graduating from the Ohio State University with three Bachelor degrees he wrote for the Columbus Call and Post, worked for the King Arts Complex, and wrote three books. This interview was conducted for the 1950s exhibit at the Ohio History Connection. In his interview he focuses on his life and experiences in the 1950s and 60s. In this interview he talks about growing up in Chillicothe, his family, school, driving culture, entertainment, media, and the church. Giles talks about growing up and living in New York, where he was during the Stonewall Riots in 1969. He discusses the differences between growing up gay in Ohio and New York. He also describes his awareness of racial issues, the civil rights, and the Korean War.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Greg Lashutka oral historyGregory Lashutka was born in 1944 and grew up in Cleveland, Ohio. He went to the Ohio State University where he played on the Buckeye football team. Lashutka played one year for the Buffalo Bills before returning to finish his undergraduate degree and go on to receive his law degree from Capital University. He served in the United States Navy and two terms as the Mayor of Columbus in the 1990s. This interview was conducted for the 1950s exhibit at the Ohio History Connection. In his interview he focuses on his life and experiences in the 1950s and 60s. In this interview Lashutka talks about growing up in Cleveland, Ohio. He discusses the repercussions of the Korean War on his family, suffering from Polio, and the importance of athletics. We shares his interests in music, tv, and film and meeting all the great Ohioans who made the 1950s great. He also discusses Cold War tensions, race relations, and what was different about the 1950s.Oral History at Ohio Memory
John Glenn oral historyJohn H. Glenn, Jr. was born in 1921 and grew up in New Concord, Ohio. He was a Marine Corps aviator in WWII and Korea, test pilot, the first astronaut to orbit the earth, and Ohio Senator for 25 years. This interview was conducted for the 1950s exhibit at the Ohio History Connection. In his interview he focuses on his life and experiences in the 1950s and 60s. Glenn talks about his choice to join the military for WWII before discussing his service in the Korea War where his wingman was baseball hall of famer, Ted Williams. He discusses the strangeness of coming home after the Korean War, volunteering for armament testing, and breaking the transcontinental speed record during Project Bullet. Glenn shares much about his time in the space program, the tensions during the Cold War, what makes Ohio a leader amongst states, and the differences between the 1950s and today.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Richard "Dick" Gorlden oral historyDick Golden was born in 1927 in Cleveland Heights, Ohio. He spent the 1940s and 50s living in Cleveland and Columbus, Ohio. After college he worked with his brother in the Ohio Monarch Cigarette Machine Company (vending), which put him in contact with many people in different communities around Columbus. This interview was conducted for the 1950s exhibit at the Ohio History Connection. In his interview he focuses on his life and experiences in the 1940s, 50s, and 60s. Golden talks about attending the Ohio State University after returning from the war and about life on campus. He discusses a wide variety of topics including the Ohio Penitentiary, Sam Sheppard, Buckeye football, and the vending machine business. He describes the Jewish community in Columbus and some of the communities he worked in around the city. Golden shares his experiences of racism and discrimination, and the Jewish response. He touches on things like music, tv, polio, cars, the bomb, and teaching English to recent immigrants.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Robin Schuricht oral historyRobin Schuricht was born in South Bend, Indiana in 1950 and grew up in Columbus, Ohio. This interview was conducted for the 1950s exhibit at the Ohio History Connection. She has worked for the Ohio History Connection for many years in the education department. In his interview she focuses on her life and experiences in the 1950s and 60s. In this interview she talks about her parents, growing up in the Whitehall area, and the biggest differences between now and then. She discusses family life, TV, Drive-ins, and music. Schuricht shares her memories of cars, polio, school, the space race, and gender roles. She discusses shopping, the Lazarus Department Store, and Christmas in the 1950s.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Richard Stoff oral historyRichard A. Stoff earned his BA in Political Science from Northeastern University and his MPA in 1975 at Syracuse University, where he concentrated in public finance. He is the founder and CEO of the Ohio Business Roundtable, a partnership of the executive officers of Ohio’s largest businesses. Formed in 1992, the Roundtable’s mission is to use the experience of its members to solve Ohio’s public policy challenges. Mr. Stoff has served hundreds of top corporate executives, in bipartisan collaboration with four governors and numerous legislative leaders to stimulate economic growth in the state of Ohio. In his interview Stoff talks about his early years working in public policy with the Governor Gilligan administration, working at the Ohio Office of Budget, and his consulting work in the private sector. He describes h transitioning back to working in the state government with Governor Voinovich's Cleveland Tomorrow and ultimately to the Ohio Business Roundtable. Stoff shares many of the projects of the Ohio Business Roundtable such as: BRIGHT New Leaders for Ohio Schools, Tax Reform, Tort Reform, and the Third Frontier. He describes the various Ohio leaders that he had worked with, his retirement, and successor Pat Tiberi. He also talks about his work to save the Drexel Theater in Bexley, Ohio. Prior to the Roundtable, Mr. Stoff was a Partner of Ernst & Young, directing the Firm’s public sector practice in Ohio, and served as a Senior Consultant with Deloitte & Touche.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Jim Dicke oral historyMr. James F. Dicke II is the Chairman/CEO of Crown Equipment Corporation in New Bremen, Ohio. The Crown Equipment Corporation is a worldwide manufacturer and distributor of electric forklift trucks and material handling equipment. Mr. Dicke is a member of the Republican National Committee, Founder of the Dicke Family Foundation, and the New Bremen Foundation. He also served as Assistant to Congressman William M. McCulloch. Mr. Dicke has served as the International President of the Young Presidents’ Organization, Chairman of the Air Force Museum Foundation Board, National Trustee of the San Antonio Museum of Art, Founding Chairman of the Ocean Reef Community Foundation, and as a member of the Dayton Power and Light Foundation. Mr. Dicke is also an artist, photographer and art collector. He is a Chairman Emeritus at the Dayton Art Institute and currently serves as a member of the Ohio Arts Council Board. Mr. Dicke is a Former Advisory Board member for the National Academy of Design, a member of the Smithsonian National Board, and a Chairman of Commissioners for the Smithsonian American Art Museum. In his interview Mr. Dicke he discusses the history of the Crown Equipment Corporation and how his family grew the company into what it is today including the origins of the name "Crown." He talks about his father's service during World War II and how a Bombsight technician and trainer got into the hand truck business. He shares what it was like growing up in New Bremen, what makes the town a great fit for Crown, and the benefits of a family owned business. Mr. Dicke speaks about his interest in art, creating a bike museum, and his role in Ohio politics. He concludes by describing Ohio's business climate and the changes in manufacturing.Oral History at Ohio Memory
John Barrett and Tom Williams oral historyJohn Barrett is the American Chairman, President and Chief Executive officer of Western & Southern Financial Group. He started at Western & Southern in 1987 as its CFO before becoming President in 1989, CEO in 1994, and Chairman in 2002. He serves on a number of boards including former chairman of the Ohio Business Roundtable. He's worked heavily with the United Way founding the Herbert R. Brown Society and United Way Women's Leadership Council. Mr. Barrett is an active philanthropist with many organization, but focuses on cancer research and treatment through the Barrett Cancer Center. Tom Williams is President and CEO of North American Properties since 1994 and served as Vice President from 1986 through 1994. He serves on numerous Boards including JobsOhio, The Western and Southern Financial Group, The Cincinnati Equity Fund, The Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation, Cincinnati Regional Business Committee, the Child Poverty Collaborative, and Cintrifuse. Mr. Williams is Vice-Chairman and one of the principal owners of the Cincinnati Reds. His philanthropy focuses on housing, poverty, and education In this video John and Tom discuss their and their familys' history with Cincinnati. They talk about what make Cincinnati great and why they are dedicated to the city's betterment. John and Tom share some of their projects including the Over the Rhine revitalization, Teach for America, Cincinnati Business Council, Child Poverty Collaborative, and working with the United Way. The describe some of the current challenges facing the city and its prospects for a bright future.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Nick Niehoff oral historyNick Niehoff was the President of the Cincinnati Stock Exchange and creator of the digital stock exchange. Nick took the model of the stock exchange and put it all online. Mr. Niehoff is to thank for any of the E-Trade type stock trading websites that have popped up since the 1980s. In this interview he talks about growing up in Cincinnati, his family's history in the financial industry, and his own start in the brokerages and stock exchanges. Niehoff's story primarily focuses on his time working with the various exchanges in order to create automated electronic exchanges that many of us are familiar with today. Congress's Securities and Exchange Amendments of 1975 paved the way to link stock exchanges around the country electronically and create the Regional Market System. Niehoff, As President of the Cincinnati Stock Exchange, spearheaded the creation of regional exchanges and ultimately put terminals linked to these exchanges in offices all over the country. More than that he helped construct data centers that pioneered technologies like hot-hot systems, the consolidated tape system, and the OTC Bulletin Board. Moving away from the "floor model" for transacting stocks put Niehoff into an often contentious relationship with the New York Stock Exchange, the largest at the time. Still he was able to work with the NYSE to create parts of the new system like the Securities Industry Automation Corporation, which supplied technical services to all of the exchanges. He even worked internationally setting up stock exchanges in London, Stockholm, Paris, Madrid, Warsaw, and others automating perhaps 90% of European markets. Niehoff concludes his interview by discussing some of the more recent by-products of his work such as, high-frequency algorithmic trading and dark pools, and their pros and cons. He also shares what he believes to be the areas for growth in the current system of exchanges.Oral History at Ohio Memory
John Ong oral historyJohn D. Ong was born in 1933 in Uhrichsville, Ohio. He received his undergraduate and masters degree from The Ohio State University and his law degree from Harvard University. He was the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer B. F. Goodrich Company from 1979 to 1996. President Reagan appointed Mr. Ong to the President’s Commission on Industrial Competitiveness in 1984. Mr. Ong was Chairman of the Business Roundtable, the National Alliance of Business, and the Ohio Business Roundtable. He is a current member of the Council of Retired Chief Executives and the Council of American Ambassadors. He has served as a Director of seven S&P 500 companies and as a United States Ambassador to Norway from 2002 to 2005. In his interview Mr. Ong talks about growing up in Urichsville, Ohio where his father work as a dealer in vegetable fats. He went on to receive a combination undergraduate and masters degree from the Ohio State University before going on to attend Harvard Law School. He discusses his four years as a Judge Advocate General for the United States Army before going on to work in the legal department at B.F. Goodrich. Within several years at Goodrich he was promoted to the president of the international division where he oversaw their plants in countries all over the world. Mr. Ong continued to rise through the ranks becoming the CEO of B.F. Goodrich where he was able to leverage partnerships and spin off parts of the company to reverse the companies flagging profitability. He goes on to discuss his work on various boards and councils including working with Presidents Regan, both Bushes, and Clinton. He describes his ambassadorship to Norway and how he was appointed. Mr. Ong also shares his relationship with Governor Voinovich and their work together.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Dick Pogue and Albert Ratner oral historyRichard ”Dick” Pogue was born on April 26, 1928 in Cambridge, Massachusetts the son of Lloyd Welch and Mary Ellen (Edgarton) Pogue. In 1930, as a two-year-old, he spent a year in Paris while his father assisted Ropes & Gray, a Boston-based law firm, in opening an international office. Following in his father’s footsteps, Mr. Pogue led Jones Day's entry into international practice. During his time the Firm opened overseas offices in London, Paris, Riyadh, Geneva, Hong Kong, Brussels, Tokyo, Taipei, and Frankfurt. He remains a Senior Advisor at Jones Day in Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. Pogue served three years, from 1954 to 1957, in the Patents Division of the Office of The Judge Advocate General of the United States Army. He was honorably discharged with the rank of Captain. He ​joined the law firm Jones, Day, Cockley & Reavis in Cleveland in 1957, and became a Partner in 1961. His primary fields of practice were antitrust, corporate merger work, and commercial arbitration/mediation. In 1984 he became Managing Partner of the Firm. During his nine years the Firm grew from 335 to 1,225 lawyers and from five domestic to 20 worldwide offices, and became the second largest U.S. law firm. Mr. Pogue has chaired many organizations including: The Cleveland Foundation, University Hospitals Health System, the Greater Cleveland Growth Association (GCGA), The City Club of Cleveland, the Presidents’ Council Foundation, the Greater Cleveland Chapter of the American Red Cross, and the United Way Campaign of 1989. Albert Ratner was born in 1927 in Cleveland, Ohio. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1945. After receiving his honorable discharge in 1948 he went to work for his family’s company, Forest City Materials, a lumber and building materials company in the founded in the 1920’s. Ratner earned his degree in forestry and returned to the family business upon graduation in 1951, and started his 66-year career at Forest City. Forest City grew from a lumber supply company, to a construction company, to a home improvement retailer, to a real estate development company. Today it is a $8.2 billion corporation that develops residential and commercial properties across the country with a national portfolio that includes 32 retail centers, 36 office buildings and 115 apartment buildings. Mr. Ratner supports many civic organizations including: Global Cleveland, The Center for Population Dynamics, the Group Plan Commission, and the Global Center for Health Innovation. He been a driver of the transformation of the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, the revitalization of the Gordon Square Arts District, and the Slavic Village Restoration Project. Both men are founding trustees of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Dr. Jeffrey WadsworthJeff Wadsworth former President and CEO of Battelle Memorial Institute since January 2009. Jeff formerly led Battelle’s Global Laboratory Operations business, where he oversaw Battelle’s management of eight major laboratories: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Department of Homeland Security’s National Biodefense Analysis and Counter measures Center, and a renewable energy laboratory in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Jeff was awarded a Doctor of Metallurgy from Sheffield University in England in 1991 for his published work and received the highest recognition conferred by the university, an honorary Doctor of Engineering degree. Jeff came to the United States in 1976 and has worked at Stanford University, Lockheed Company, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In 2002, he joined Battelle and from 2003 to June 2007 Jeff was director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 2005. Jeff has authored or coauthored nearly 300 scientific papers and 1 book, and he has been granted 4 U.S. patents. His many honors and awards include three honorary doctorates, two honorary professorships, and election to the rank of Fellow of three technical societies.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Viola Pagliaro & Nick Stellanova oral historyViola Pagliaro & Nick Stellanova are member of the LGBTQ+ community who share with us their experiences of coming out and finding a home together in Columbus, Ohio. Viola talks about her struggles when she was younger, her decision to transition, and her work as an activist in the LGBTQ+ community. Nick is an artist and talks about his art and the modern LGBTQ+ community in Columbus. They both discuss the difficulties presented by the Covid-19 pandemic, politics in 2021, and the Black Lives Matter movement.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Dr. Evelyn Luckey oral historyDr. Evelyn Luckey was born in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania in 1927. Her family moved to the Youngstown area in the 1940s in search of work. She attended university in Wilberforce, Ohio before transferring to the Ohio State University. Dr. Luckey went on to get a doctorate of philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction. She is a former Assistant Superintendent of the Columbus Ohio Public School District, having work in the District for 37 years. In her interview she talks about her college experience, the vibrant neighborhoods along Mount Vernon Avenue, and why her father moved the family to Youngstown. She discusses her time teaching in Durham and racism in Ohio.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Arnett Howard oral historyArnett Howard was born in 1950 and grew up in Plain City, Ohio. He has been a fixture of the Ohio music scene since the 1960s playing in many bands, eventually starting his own Arnett Howard's Creole Funk Band and Arnett Howard and Friends. In his interview he talks about how he got his start as a musician, the early music scene around Mount Vernon Avenue, and his own history in the music industry. He discusses what made Mount Vernon Avenue such a thriving Black community, some of the local clubs and theaters, and his interest in history that lead to his book "Listen for the Jazz: Key Notes in Columbus History."Oral History at Ohio Memory
Marvin Bonowitz oral historyMarvin Bonowitz was born in 1927 in Columbus, Ohio. He was a long time resident of the Near East Side and of Bexley, Ohio. His father owned the Vernon Tailoring & Clothing Company on Mount Vernon Avenue, which Marvin went on to run before opening Top Drawer Men's Shop in Bexley. Bonowitz taught nursing at the Grant Hospital School of Nursing and The Ohio State University Hospital. In his interview he talks about his early memories of the Mount Vernon neighborhood and the thriving community there. He discusses attending East High School, why the neighborhood was such a hub for the Black community, and the changes that lead to many of the businesses and people leaving. A historian himself, Marvin collected oral histories from the Mount Vernon area and put them in a book "Mt. Vernon Ave." with the support of the Jewish Historical Society.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Juanita Cartier oral historyJuanita Whaley Cartier was born in Columbus, Ohio in 1926. She worked for the Ohio Aid for the Aged and the Department of Human Services. As a long time resident of the Mount Vernon Avenue area she was an expert in its history. In her interview she talks about the Mount Vernon Avenue area particularly about its theaters, door to door services, and hotels. Mrs. Cartier discusses the segregation in Columbus and how Frank Shearer and her cousin Constance Nichols worked to end it. She describes the historic Black churches of Columbus, her own being St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church. She shares a story about artist Elijah Pierce making her a carving, and her children's experiences growing up in Columbus.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Reita Smith oral historyReita Smith was born in Columbus, Ohio in 1936. She is a historian and community activist who has spent much time preserving and sharing the history of the Black community around Mount Vernon Avenue. In her interview Ms. Smith shares her childhood growing up in the Mount Vernon Ave area. She discusses many of the businesses that made the area vibrant in the mid-twentieth century. She talks about the churches, door-to-door salespeople, streetcars, underground railroad, and what kids did for fun along Mount Vernon Avenue.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Rhiannon Childs oral historyRhiannon Childs is Executive Director for Women's March Ohio and Regional Field Manager for Planned Parenthood Advocates of Ohio. Rhiannon’s served in the United States Air Force as a cardiopulmonary technician, dealing with illnesses of the heart and lungs. She is also the Chair of Community Outreach for Lean In Ohio, a member of the King Arts Complex Women's Service Board, and the Health and Legislative Chair for the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Inc. Columbus, Ohio Chapter. In her interview she shares her experience organizing the Women's March Ohio, her work as a planned parenthood advocate, and the importance and impact of her advocacy.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Julia Applegate oral historyJulia Applegate directs the Institute for LGBTQ Health Equity at Equitas Health where she leads LGBTQ health education, research and community engagement efforts. Prior to joining Equitas Health, Julia directed the LGBTQ Health Initiative at Columbus Public Health. She has worked in public health programs focused on women’s health, HIV/AIDS, and LGBTQ Health. With over 10 years of experience, Julia is a skilled presenter who has conducted Train the Trainer programs and presented at local, state, national and international conferences on public health, HIV/AIDS, gender and sexual orientation topics. She focuses on questions of health equity, diversity and inclusion for marginalized and underserved communities. Julia has done policy and program development at the local, state and international levels as a government employee and as a member of a Board of Directors. She is currently working on obtaining a Master of Public Health degree from The Ohio State University. In her interview she talks about how she became an activist, social determinant of health, and the role of community in health. Applegate discusses her struggles with identity, why she cam to and stayed in Columbus, the lesbian community in the 1990s, and her work with the H.I.S. Kings.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Paula Haines oral historyPaula Haines is the CEO of Freedom a la Cart, a Columbus, Ohio based nonprofit catering social enterprise and workforce development program. Freedom a la Cart serves and supports survivors of human trafficking on their journey toward economic self-sufficiency. Participants in this comprehensive community-based treatment focus on recovery, rehabilitation, and, restoration. Haines discusses the history and purpose of Freedom a la Cart which started in 2009 as a supportive arm for CATCH Court, Changing Actions To Change Habits. She talks about how she became involved with Freedom al a Cart, how the program has evolved, and how they want to expand in the future. She shares some remarkable examples of how Freedom al a Cart has supported victims of human trafficking.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Ohio Lesbian Archives oral historyIn 1989, Phebe Beiser and Victoria Ramstetter turned leftover collections from Dinah, a monthly newsletter vital in connecting the local lesbian community, into the Ohio Lesbian Archives. The original location was a room on the third floor of Crazy Ladies Bookstore after the store closed in 2006 it moved to Clifton United Methodist Church. The archives, open by appointment, includes nearly 1,000 books bearing titles like Lesbian Art in America, The Gay and Lesbian Literary Heritage, and Gone is the Shame: A Compendium of Lesbian Erotica. Materials in the archives include: magazines, photos and banners from Pride marches, newspaper clippings, every issue of Dinah, political materials, records, and videos. The Ohio Lesbian Archives has items from the entire LGBTQ spectrum but prioritizes lesbian stories at its inception due to the exclusion they felt, even among gay activists. In this interview Beiser and Ramstetter talk about the founding of the Archives, how it has evolved, and the lesbian community in Cincinnati.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Luster Singleton oral historyLuster is a native of Zanesville, Ohio. Luster is a trans-masculine activist, a TedX speaker, and a Drag King performer who founded a Drag King show and community experience. Luster is a graduate of The Ohio State University with a Master’s in Women’s Studies. He is a former coordinator of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Student Services and director of Ethnic Student Services at OSU. She has been a coordinator of the Pride Family and Teen Area for Stonewall Columbus’ yearly Pride Festival for 14 years. He is an accomplished gender performer known for their gender bending portrayals of the Lustivious Dela Virgion and Luster Dela V. She is the co-founder of 1990s nationally and internationally acclaimed drag king troupe, H.I.S. KINGS and IDKE (The International Drag King Extravaganza), featured in several documentaries.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Ray Jeffery oral historyRay Jeffery was born March 20, 1923 in Paulding, Ohio. He lived in Antwerp, Ohio for 72 years while working for International Harvest and farming in both Antwerp and Paulding. In this video he talks about his grandfather, James Jeffrey's, (b. 1825) work on the underground railroad. He also discusses his family's immigration to Ohio, his own history, and the reservoir war.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Martha Otto oral historyMartha Otto joined the Ohio History Connection in 1961 working in almost every position in the Archaeology Department from Student Assistant to Senior Curator. She has participated in numerous excavations of Adena, Hopewell, Late Woodland, and Late Prehistoric sites in central and southern Ohio. Otto developed and installed all of the exhibits at the Society's archaeological site museums as well as the archaeological exhibits at the Ohio Historical Center, including The First Ohioans and Windows To Our Collections: Ohio's Ancient Past. Otto has served as president of the Archaeological Society of Ohio, the Ohio Archaeological Council, and the Eastern States Archaeological Federation. In her interview she talks about some of her first jobs at the Ohio History Connection, the professionals that shaped her career, and working on many of the archaeological exhibits around the state. Otto also discusses some of the excavations she was involved in (Enos Holmes Mound), some of the most interesting archaeological finds during her time, and the early work to comply with NAGPRA.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Leslie Floyd oral historyLeslie Floyd is a former registrar, curator, collections manager for the Ohio History Connection. She was hired in 1978 and held many positions over her 30 years with the institution. In this interview she talks about her early years with the institution working as a typist in the archaeology department. After receiving her masters in history Leslie began working more directly with the collections. She discusses some of the projects and exhibits that she worked on at the History Center and sites around the state. She shares a lot about the former employee that she worked with in the history department and what it was like working in the collections warehouses. Leslie describes how she feels the History Connection has changed since she began working there and the projects left unfinished.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Bob Glotzhober oral historyBob Glotzhober is a Curator Emeritus of the Ohio History Connection where he worked for 33 years with the natural history collections, public programs, exhibits, and management of OHS’s natural areas. Special projects included coordinating the Ohio Dragonfly Survey and working with remains of Pleistocene mammals. Prior to OHS he spent three years teaching high school biology, and four years working as a naturalist for the National Wildlife Federation and the Michigan Audubon Society. Bob has a MS in Zoology from Michigan State University. He served on the Ohio Natural Areas Council for 15 years and was also a member of the Federal Recovery Team for the Hine’s Emerald Dragonfly. In 2008 he was awarded the Wildlife Diversity Conservation Award by the Ohio Division of Wildlife for his work with dragonflies and damselflies in Ohio. In 2011 he was given the Distinguished Professional Interpreter Award by the Great Lakes Region of the National Association for Interpretation. In 2014 he was given the Naturalist Award from the Ohio Biological Survey for his years of work promoting the natural history of Ohio. In his interview Bob talks about how he became interested in natural history, some of his first jobs, and how he began working at the History Connection. He discusses some of his early projects planning programs for sites around the state, doing natural history walks, and the dragonfly survey. He describes the cultural shifts at the History Connection, working at Fort Hill and Cedar Bog, and deer culling at Adena. Bob shares the best and worst thing about his job, which happens to be the same thing, and how he feels about his time working in natural history.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Bill Schultz oral historyWilliam T Schultz is a former Natural History Curator, Director of Sites, and Superintendent of Site Operations at the Ohio History Connection. He was hired by the History Connection in 1970 to help with the move from the former building at 15th and High Street on OSU campus. Schultz was given a full-time job writing for the Natural History Department before becoming a curator and eventually managing the department from 1979-1983. He was promoted to Director of Site Operations and took over as Site Superintendent of Sites in 1996. He has been key to developing the History Connection's natural history sites like Cedar Bog and Leo Petroglyphs. In his interview Schultz talks about his early interest in natural history and how he became involved with the History Connection. He describes some of the projects he's worked on over the years such as uncovering the Glacial Grooves and excavating the McGill mammoth in Champaign County. He discusses his work with sites, the snows of 1977-78, pastries, the original layout of the History Center, and many of the people he worked with over his career.Oral History at Ohio Memory
Tyler Family Reunion oral historiesDescendants of James Seneca Tyler, the first African American elected Clerk to the Ohio House of Representatives, and his wife, Maria McAfee, daughter of an indentured servant who helped raise the children of the prominent Alfred Kelley family of Columbus, met August 5-6 in Columbus for the Tyler Family "Homecoming" Family Reunion.
Many of the descendants will met each other for the first time.

In the Tyler Family Legacy Project, a partnership between the Tyler family and the Ohio Historical Society, the Tyler Family Reunion included a reception, a small exhibit and a genealogical workshop at the Ohio Historical Center's Archives/Library in Columbus.

Staff members of the Ohio Historical Society videotaped interviews with Tyler family members, made copies for the family and placed the series of recordings in the Society's permanent collections. In addition, the Tyler family and the Ohio Historical Society unveiled an Ohio Historical Marker about the Tyler family, placed in Goodale Park in Columbus later this year. James Seneca Tyler lived at 1107 Highland Ave. in Victorian Village with his family from the 1880s until his death in 1916.

Distinguished family members include James Seneca Tyler (1837-1916), the first African-American elected Clerk to the Ohio House of Representatives and a personal friend to former Governor Joseph B. Foraker and President William McKinley; and sons Jesse Gerald Tyler (1879-1932), an accomplished classical pianist; physician James Adolph Tyler (1871-1932); Julius Boston Tyler (1872-1944) the first African American to score a touchdown for Ohio State University football in 1896 and journalist Ralph Waldo Tyler (1859-1921), the first black war correspondent to report on the activities of African-American soldiers stationed overseas during World War I.


Ralph Waldo Tyler also worked as society editor for The Columbus Dispatch, cultivating as sources his many acquaintances who were servants of prominent families of Columbus. Tyler also was secretary to Robert F. Wolfe, publisher of The Dispatch and The Ohio State Journal.
In addition, James Seneca Tyler's grandsons, all deceased, include Harold McAfee Tyler, a Chicago lawyer who defended the Tuskegee Airmen at Freeman Field; Waldo Woodson Tyler, a pharmacist and entrepreneur who founded Tyler Drug Stores; and Ralph C. Tyler, an engineer and stand-out Ohio State University athlete who founded the Ralph Tyler Companies, an engineering and architectural consulting firm in Cleveland.

Living descendants of James Seneca Tyler and Maria McAfee Tyler include Dana Tyler, great-great-granddaughter, co-anchor for WCBS-TV in New York and a former journalist for WBNS-TV in Columbus; Lauren Tyler, great-great granddaughter, investment banker and managing director of B.E. 100 Quetzal/JPMorgan Partners in New York; Ralph S. Tyler, great grandson, president & CEO of Ralph Tyler Companies in Cleveland; Charles Tyler Collins, great grandson, former tour director for Stevie Wonder; and Collins' daughter, Tyler Collins, an accomplished recording artist who has worked under the Disney label.

The family's achievements also are noted in Annette Taborn, a blues singer, and Amy Tyler Wilkins, a principal partner in The Education Trust, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit dedicated to educational reform.

The collections includes multiple oral history recordings with Tyler family member talking about their family's legacy.
Katherine Tyler & Cole Mersereau
Lauren Tyler
Kendall James Tyler Pleasant
Malcolm D. McCoy
Leah Wright, Chaney Wright, Kendall Pleasant
Kim Tyler Snyder
Kelly McCoy Williams
Jeannette Taborn (Tyler)
Gary Russell Tyler
Emily Faye Tyler Mixon
Dana Tyler
Carol Tyler (Dandridge)

Special Collecting Initiatives – 

Black History

Ohio has a rich history of Black communities. Lincoln Heights, near Cincinnati, was the first self-governing Black town north of the Mason-Dixon line. Wilberforce, Ohio established the third Black college in the nation in 1856.  The Ohio History Connection is chronicling Black history and experiences throughout Ohio through oral histories. As part of the establishment of the new Poindexter Village historical site and in conjunction with the James Preston Poindexter Foundation the Ohio History Connection is seeking people to share their stories.  Of particular interest are those of the King-Lincoln and East Side neighborhoods of Columbus.  If you are interested please contact us or go to our “Share Your Story” page.

GOHI

The Gay Ohio History Initiative (GOHI) is a special collecting initiative of the Ohio History Connection. GOHI collects, preserves and shares Ohio’s LGBTQ past. The Ohio History Connection and GOHI are dedicated to preserving stories from all Ohioans. Do you know an Ohioan who we should record? At the moment, GOHI especially wants to hear the stories of LGBTQ+ Ohioans of color, those who grew up and/or live in rural and Appalachian Ohio and any community members who were on the “front lines” of 2020 including healthcare and essential workers, first responders, activists, artists and more. If you are interested email us at GOHI@ohiohistory.org or go to our “Share Your Story” page.